Ulmus rubra


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Related to Ulmus rubra: Ulmus fulva

slippery elm

Herbal medicine
A deciduous tree that contains mucilage, starch and tannins; its inner bark is emollient and mildly astringent. Slippery elm has been used internally for coughs, diarrhoea, gastrointestinal inflammation, constipation, menstrual and renal dysfunction and sore throat; it is used topically for burns, wounds and dry skin.
 
Toxicity
Contact dermatitis caused by powdered bark.
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Species Seedlings Small Saplings Large Saplings Carya ovata 2166.7 258.3 26.6 Ulmus rubra 1583.3 475.0 23.3 Quercus alba 1583.3 100.0 23.3 Quercus velutina 1500.0 75.0 -- Sassafras albidum 1500.0 141.7 46.7 Fraxinus americana 1083.3 500.0 43.3 Carya tomentosa 916.7 800.0 40.0 Amelanchier arborea 916.7 50.0 10.0 Prunus serotina 666.7 50.0 33.3 Asimina triloba 500.0 516.7 40.0 Ostrya virginiana 500.0 91.7 30.0 Carya glabra 500.0 16.7 3.3 Celtis occidentalis 416.7 -- -- Acer saccharum 333.3 316.7 73.3 Cornus florida 333.3 75.0 450.0 Quercus imbricaria 333.3 16.7 -- Ulmus americana 166.7 58.3 40.0 Cercis canadensis 83.3 -- -- Diospyros virginiana 83.3 -- -- Morus rubra -- 16.7 -- Carya cordiformis -- 8.3 6.7 Acer ginnala -- 8.3 -- Totals 15166.6 3575.1 889.8 Table 3.
However, the community of this ELTP was strongly dominated by late successional species including Fagus grandifolia, Acer saccharum, Ulmus rubra, Fraxinus, Carya cordiformis and other mesophytes (combined IV = 63.5; Table 2).
Additional common species found among plots included Celtis occidentalis, Platanus occidentals, Quercus bicolor, and Ulmus rubra. Some less common species found included Aesculus glabra, Fraxinus quadrangulata, Gleditisia triacanthos, Juglans nigra, Prunus serotina, Quercus muehlenbergii, Robinia pseuodacacia, and Maclura pomifera.
Those findings generally agree with our data from BSR: Salix nigra and Daubentonia drummondii tolerate the wettest conditions, whereas Acer rubrum, Fraxinus americana and Diospyros virginiana tolerate slightly drier soils and intergrade with species such as Quercus virginiana, Celtis laevigata, Liquidambar styraciflua and Ulmus rubra (more common at "high-ridge" elevations).
Ulmus rubra was codominant in 90 year old successional stands in Ohio (Vankat and Snyder, 1991), and an early to mid-successional species in other parts of central Illinois (McClain and Ebinger, 1968).
Trees were co-dominated by Fraxinus americana, Ulmus rubra, and Acer saccharum.
Based on relative importance values (RIV), the important species for the floodplain woods to the north of the summit are Populus deltoides, Ulmus americana, Platanus occidentalis, and Robinia pseudoacacia, while the important species for the floodplain woods to the south of the summit are Acer saccharum, Aesculus glabra, Ulmus rubra, and Celtis occidentalis.
13 Pinus strobus 137 1872 3.0 Carpinus caroliniana 49 502 1.2 Prunus serotina 28 182 0.7 Carya ovata 17 27 0.4 Quercus rubra 15 53 0.3 Ulmus rubra 15 99 0.4
Quercus alba and Ulmus rubra were the next most important and the only other species with relative importance values above 9.0.
Acer saccharum 42.2 34.3 23.1 29.9 56.1 29.9 35.9 Prunus serotina 44.2 10.4 14.6 40.0 3.7 11.6 20.7 Liriodendron tulipifera 6.1 15.8 3.7 14.7 6.7 Fagus grandifolia 0.5 8.5 7.3 0.2 12.8 6.1 5.9 Sassafras albidum 5.2 1.2 4.9 8.2 1.2 4.3 4.2 Fraxinus americana 1.6 1.8 1.2 11.7 1.2 1.2 3.1 Quercus rubra 0.3 1.8 7.9 7.9 3.0 Quercus alba 0.6 7.9 0.6 4.9 2.3 Carpinus caroliniana 0.1 8.0 0.6 0.8 1.2 1.8 Acer rubrum 1.8 0.6 1.8 1.7 1.8 3.1 1.8 Ostrva virginiana <0.1 3.7 2.4 0.4 3.7 1.8 2.0 Ulmus rubra 0.6 4.3 1.8 2.1 0.6 1.6 Cornus florida 5.5 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.5 Ulmus americana 0.1 1.8 1.2 3.7 1.8 1.4 Cercis canadensis 4.3 0.6 1.8 1.1 Acer negundo 1.4 1.2 0.6 1.2 0.6 0.9 Carya sp.
Roost #380 was a slippery elm (Ulmus rubra) 51 cm dbh and roost #708 was an American elm (Ulmus americana) 34 cm dbh (Table 2), while dominate trees near them were 25-30 cm dbh American elm, black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), and black walnut (Juglans nigra).