Ureaplasma urealyticum

(redirected from U. urealyticum)

U·re·a·plas·ma u·re·a·ly'·ti·cum

a species that has been isolated from the respiratory tract and central nervous system of newborns. It causes infections of the genitourinary tract, particularly urethritis; thought to be sexually transmitted and transmitted from mother to infant. The laboratory diagnosis is simplified through the use of urea-containng agar, permitting detection of the tiny colonies.

Ureaplasma urealyticum

[-plaz′mə]
a sexually transmitted microorganism that is a common inhabitant of the urogenital systems of men and women in whom infection is asymptomatic. Neonatal death, prematurity, and perinatal morbidity are statistically associated with colonization of the chorionic surface of the placenta by Ureaplasma urealyticum. The mechanisms by which the unfavorable effects on pregnancy occur are not understood. There is no characteristic lesion in the fetus or newborn. Treatment involves oral tetracyclines administered for a period of at least 7 days.

Ureaplasma urealyticum

T strain mycoplasma Microbiology A species of small gram-negative bacteria of the family Mycoplasmataceae that lack a cell wall and catabolize urea–to ammonia; U urealyticum resides in the genital tract and nasopharynx, is sexually transmitted, and causes nongonococcal urethritis, urethroprostatitis, epididymitis in ♂; UTIs, fetal wastage, chorioamnionitis, and ↑ infertility in ♀, URIs; CNS infections in neonates Management Tetracycline–eg, doxycycline; if resistant, erythromycin. See Mycoplasma hominis. Cf Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

Ureaplasma urealyticum

(ū-rē″ă-plăs′mă)
A mycoplasma that is usually sexually transmitted. It may cause inflammation of the reproductive or urinary tracts in males and females. It has been implicated in a wide variety of infections in babies with low birth weight.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common infectious pathogen found was chlamydia (26%), followed by U.
Reverse therapy was still not effective in some men with U.
This study focuses on a subset of 351 women/infant pairs in the population who had umbilical cord blood cultures for U.
The aim of this prospective study was to investigate colonization of U.
The peripheral total leukocyte counts and mortality rate were higher in infants with U.
Interpretation & conclusion: None of the 20 babies colonized with U.
The present study was therefore carried out to determine the colonization rate of U.
The oligonucleotide primers U5 sense (5'-CAA TCT GCT CGT GAA GTA TTA C-3') and U4 antisense (5'-ACG ACG TCC ATA AGC AAC T-3') used to amplify a 429 bp region of the U.
All the blood (54 samples) and CSF (14 samples) cultures were negative for U.
Over recent years, several studies have investigated the association between U.
Many Western studies have evaluated different PCR systems, commercial as well as in-house PCR assays, and many of these have been shown to be highly sensitive for the detection of U.