purple

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purple

 [pur´p'l]
1. a color between blue and red.
2. a substance of this color used as a dye or indicator.
visual purple rhodopsin.

pur·ple

(pŭr'pĕl),
A color formed by a mixture of blue and red. For individual purple dyes see specific name.
[L. purpura]
Drug slang A regional term for ketamine
Fringe medicine/Quackery A colour believed to be good for emotional problems, rheumatism, epilepsy, reducing pain, deep tissue work, bones, as understood in the context of the pseudoscience known as colour therapy

pur·ple

(pŭr'pĕl)
A color formed by a mixture of blue and red.
[L. purpura]

purple 

A mixture, in suitable proportions, of short wave radiations (less than 400 nm) and long wave radiations (greater than 700 nm). It is a complementary colour to yellow-green. Purples are colour stimuli represented on the chromaticity diagram by the straight line joining the ends of the spectrum locus. Syn. non-spectral colour; non-spectral purple.

Patient discussion about purple

Q. what is a purple spot on penis

A. could be some kind of hematoma- a bruise, blood vessels that bleed internally and caused a"papula". if you press it and it changes color to white- that could be it. if not, here are some more suggestions:
http://menshealth.about.com/od/diseasesconditions/a/penis_spots.htm

Q. why my hands are getting purple and freezing?

A. thank you, but these answers are not correct answers for my question

More discussions about purple
References in periodicals archive ?
Tyrian purple is generated from indoxyl sulfate precursors in the hypobranchial glands of Muricidae (Baker & Sutherland 1968).
The main aim of this study was to compare the biochemical profiles of microbial communities derived from different tissues of Dicathais orbita, to establish whether any unique bacteria or distinct bacterial communities are associated with the biosynthetic organs compared with tissues that are known not to be involved in Tyrian purple production.
Can the collection of "Tyrian Purple" from Plicopurpura pansa (Gould, 1853) (Prosobranchia, Muricidae) be blamed for its declining population?
In the Old World the production and use of "Tyrian purple" was forgotten with the fall of Byzantium (Constantinople) in 1453 A:D.
According to Bolognani-Fantin and Ottaviani (1981) the great number of different cells with different functions is a characteristic of the hypobranchial gland of "Tyrian Purple" producing species.
pansa for the production of "Tyrian Purple" it can be observed that it resulted in a decrease of the snail population, in spite of careful treatment of the snails during the "ink" collection and replacement afterwards on the rocks where they have been previously removed.
After the development of new analytical methods the exact determination and description of the different precursors leading to "Tyrian Purple" was only recently possible.
Photolysis of tyriverdin gives dibromoindigo, the main component of Tyrian purple, and the odorous dimethyl disulfide (Cooksey 2001).
As in antiquity in the Old World, the use of muricids to obtain Tyrian purple for dyeing led also on the Pacific coast of Central America and Mexico to a product of high economic value.
pansa be "milked" periodically to obtain Tyrian purple without harming the animal, however, too frequent milking caused mortalities.
KEY WORDS: Plicopurpura pansa, purple snail, Tyrian purple
giving what is known as "Tyrian purple," "Royal purple," or "Shellfish purple." Mollusk purple as such does not occur in the live animal, but is formed during a sequence of chemical reactions in the presence of oxygen and light from the secretions produced by the animal.