Tyndall effect

(redirected from Tyndall scattering)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Tyn·dall phe·nom·e·non

(tin'dĕl),
the visibility of floating particles in gases or liquids when illuminated by a ray of sunlight and viewed at right angles to the illuminating ray.
Synonym(s): Tyndall effect

Tyndall effect

Dermatology The change that light undergoes as it passes through a turbid medium–eg, skin, causing the colors of the spectrum to scatter; colors with a longer wavelength–red, orange and yellow tend to continue traveling forward while those with a shorter wavelength–blue, indigo and violet scatter to the side and backward; the TE explains why a subcutaneous lesion, which should have a red-brown hue due to hemorrhage or melanin deposition, has a blue tinge

Tyndall,

John, English physicist, 1820-1893.
Tyndall effect - Synonym(s): Tyndall phenomenon
Tyndall light - light that is reflected by gas- or liquid-suspended particles.
Tyndall phenomenon - the visibility of floating particles in gases or liquids when illuminated by a ray of sunlight and viewed at right angles to the illuminating ray. Synonym(s): Tyndall effect
tyndallization - exposure to a temperature of 100°C (flowing steam) for a definite period, usually an hour, on each of several days. Synonym(s): fractional sterilization

Tyndall effect

the light reflected by particles suspended in a gas or liquid. Called also Tyndall light phenomenon.