Twinkie Defense


Also found in: Wikipedia.
A legal tack used by the defendant in a high-profile criminal trial in San Francisco, who claimed that his actus reus—criminal act—resulted from chemical imbalances induced by ‘junk food’ (Twinkies) and that there was no mens rea—criminal intent
References in periodicals archive ?
Milk was assassinated in 1978 and his killer's infamous "Twinkie defense" whereby the defense argued that Milk's killer's consumption of Twinkies reflected the depth of a depression that was behind his actions catches students' attention, she said.
Milk may be best known as the gay politician who was assassinated in 1978 in San Francisco, prompting the Twinkie Defense.
Blinder's assessment was later mis-summarized and referred to as the "Twinkie Defense."
He tried all the best defenses: the "gloves-are-too-small" defense, the "she-was-just-trying-to-help" defense and, of course, the Twinkie defense. (Actually, this is my second bust.
(The press labeled this, infamously, as the "Twinkie Defense.")
In 1974, unable to continue subsidizing The Realist, he took an 11-year hiatus, during which time he covered the Patty Hearst trial for Playboy and the Dan White murder trial, with the infamous "Twinkie Defense," for The Nation.
-Paul Krassner, "The Milk-Moscone Case Revisited," on the "twinkie defense," upon White's release from prison, January 14, 1984
Whether it's Halloween, horror, sex, the infamous "Twinkie defense," or the origin of Christmas as a holiday, here's where you'll find the scoop.
White's lawyers presented what came to be known as the "Twinkie Defense," claiming their client had temporarily lost his mind because he had eaten too much junk food.
Outrage spread over ridiculous defense strategies, and many states banned what came to be known as the "Twinkie defense." (White committed suicide in October 1985 after his release from prison.)
These excuses range from the Twinkie Defense, a claim of impaired judgment due to the toxic effects of junk food, to claims of psychosexual abuse, to the abuse excuse - that a woman may castrate or shoot a brutal husband even though he is asleep.
Unlike White, whose tape-recorded confession necessitated his infamous Twinkie defense, Dawson relied on an all-white Southern jury who could blind themselves to the video tape of the incident and conclude that the Klansmen were victims acting in self-defense.