idioglossia

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idioglossia

 [id″e-o-glos´e-ah]
imperfect articulation, with utterance of meaningless vocal sounds. adj., adj idioglot´tic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

id·i·o·glos·si·a

(id'ē-ō-glos'ē-ă),
An extreme form of lalling or vowel or consonant substitution, by which the speech of a child may be made unintelligible and appear to be another language to one who does not have the key to the literal changes.
[idio- + G. glōssa, tongue, speech]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

id·i·o·glos·si·a

(id'ē-ō-glos'ē-ă)
1. A unique spoken language invented by a person, differing markedly from normal speech and for the most part unintelligible to listeners, so that it is not a useful form of communication; usually a sign of psychosis or mental retardation. 2. A type of spoken communication developed by and used between twins.
Synonym(s): idiolalia.
[idio- + G. glōssa, tongue, speech]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Various scenarios are investigated on the basis of the empirical evidence available, including feral children (who receive no input and do not develop language); and creoles, twin languages, and deaf sign languages (where it seems, clearly in the case of deaf sign languages, only on certain approaches in the case of creoles, that provision of a lexicon is sufficient for the development of a fully fledged language).
In particular, under normal conditions, children do not (with the possible exception of twin languages; see section 4.2.) create their own languages as a long-term, solution to the problem of their communication needs.
Warren and Jeener's descriptions of the intermolecular spin-spin effect--in the twin languages of quantum mechanics and classical physics--eventually removed the long-standing doubt that these interactions show up in magnetic resonance data.