Twelve-Step Program

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Twelve-Step Program

Any program modelled after the 12-step self-help-group program used by Alcoholics Anonymous for rehabilitating alcoholics; central to all such programs is the belief in a God, transpersonal spiritual form of energy or superhuman power.

12-step programs have been developed for those with cocaine abuse, emotional lability (Emotions Anonymous), obesity (Overeaters Anonymous), sexual addiction (Sexaholics Anonymous) and others.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Twelve-Step Program

Addiction disorders Any program modeled after the 12-step self-help-group programs used for rehabilitating alcoholics, Alcoholics Anonymous; central to all 12-SPs is the belief in a God, transpersonal spiritual form of energy, or superhuman power
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Twelve-step programs name this as making a fearless moral inventory and sharing it with a trusted friend.
It helps me to remember that this longing for clarity, so familiar to those in Twelve-Step programs, is expressed in a prayer for help--in the fervent hope for a kind of discernment that relies on God's grace and strength, every day.
Twelve-step programs include making a list of those you have harmed, sharing it with someone and then making amends, when possible.
Throughout the book McCorkel draws comparisons between PHW and twelve-step programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA).
TWELVE-STEP PROGRAMS are renowned for their ability to bring communities of sufferers of addictions and compulsive disorders together in a climate of support and respect, and through the steps, to empower sufferers to create personal change for a healthier life.
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The chapter discusses the Twelve-Step programs including Alcoholics Anonymous.
Expert opinions and references to twelve-step programs lend gravitas to the text.
Twelve-step programs are full of people who progress, some despite vociferous inner protest, to Step 5: Admit to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
Twelve-step programs have always suggested putting on paper a "searching and fearless moral inventory," where people in recovery take a look at their lives and write down what they see.
Twelve-step programs have been the mainstay for helping alcoholics to quit drinking, but a significant number of people who try these programs do not find them helpful or suffer relapses.
Indeed, AAAP psychiatrists did not discount twelve-step programs such as AA despite originally organizing in response to ASAM physicians who advocated twelve-step programs professionally, used them personally, and, as examined below, despite accusing addiction medicine physicians of relying almost exclusively on twelve-step treatment due to ASAM's tradition of physicians in recovery.