Twelve-Step Program


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Twelve-Step Program

Any program modelled after the 12-step self-help-group program used by Alcoholics Anonymous for rehabilitating alcoholics; central to all such programs is the belief in a God, transpersonal spiritual form of energy or superhuman power.

12-step programs have been developed for those with cocaine abuse, emotional lability (Emotions Anonymous), obesity (Overeaters Anonymous), sexual addiction (Sexaholics Anonymous) and others.

Twelve-Step Program

Addiction disorders Any program modeled after the 12-step self-help-group programs used for rehabilitating alcoholics, Alcoholics Anonymous; central to all 12-SPs is the belief in a God, transpersonal spiritual form of energy, or superhuman power
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You do not have to tell people that you are now sober in Alcoholics Anonymous or clean in another Twelve-Step program. It is nobody's business.
The twelve-step program of AA takes a central role in the novel, becoming the support that helps Natalie through her dangerous behavior when the adults around her are unable to.
One of North Star Bakery's customers joked with Owner Donna Young about starting a twelve-step program to help those who have gone to the bakery, tried the morning buns, and now find themselves returning time after time for the delicious pastries.
Answers to these questions set the stage for what many spiritual masters call the purgative way, in which the Twelve-Step Program of Alcoholic Anonymous is suggested as a framework to one's first steps into spiritual wholeness.
When this happens, AA's defenders usually assert that the organization isn't really all that religious and that the "power greater than ourselves" referred to in its famous twelve-step program doesn't have to be God.
Thus, our twelve-step program is intended to deal with settler citizenship, privilege, and change, not with policy for Indigenous liberation.
The Twelve-Step program is a very commonly used approach in the field of addiction recovery.
Their treatment is based on the twelve-step program of Alcoholics Anonymous, and in their wills they attribute their success in recovery to a willingness to adopt religious or spiritual principles to guide them to make better choices.
The first group advocates "nothing else but the twelve-step program, and you better join that church and follow it to the letter of the law." The second group is "tuned in to detoxification, maybe some medications ...
The authors write at length about the Twelve-Step Program, its popularity and success rate.
Less specific to the mission of the twelve-step program is the idea behind Tradition Twelve, that anonymity is "the spiritual foundation" of the program's traditions.