Tweed


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Tweed

(twēd),
Charles H., U.S. orthodontist, 1895-1970. See: Tweed edgewise treatment, Tweed triangle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Magistrates adjourned sentencing until March 26 so reports can be prepared on Tweed's background.
Ackerman, in Boss Tweed, has produced a history not only of Tweed, but of the decades of his greatest prominence and greatest ignominy, a history of his partners in crime and his most implacable enemies.
achievement internationally, Tweed says the attention should turn to looking at what successful states and countries are doing right.
The Silvery Tweed dust collection system employs a wing type reverse jet cleaning system.
Cropped cardigan, $59; asymmetrically hemmed tweed skirt, $79; T-shirt, $34: all DKNY Jeans Juniors.
The Roaring '20s brought to life a lot of innovations: bobbed hair for women, jazz music and a new use for a haberdashery standard -- tweed. That warm and fuzzy, woolen slubbed fabric was originally handwoven on the banks of the Tweed River in England and quickly became a staple for menswear.
The city's poor and illiterate (those unable to read) easily understood Nast's images, which helped turn public opinion a Tweed. Study the cartoon, then answer the questions.
Fields was furious earlier this week about City Hall's plans to relocate the headquarters of the 5th Avenue museum to the infamous Tweed Courthouse.
In 1870, an outraged Nast began a blistering graphic assault on Tweed and his cronies, literally picturing them for what they were: pillagers, vultures, and thieves.
The Duchess of Cambridge is a big fan of tweed outfits.
It means the county which boasts the River Tweed now has its own fabric of the same name.
As the name suggests, the fabric of tweed forms the foundation for this look.