turnover rate

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turnover rate

an assessment of the ability of an enzyme to catalyse a reaction, as measured by the number of molecules of substrate which react per second at one ACTIVE SITE when the enzyme is saturated with substrate. The turnover rate varies widely between different enzymes.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
6 percent in the last quarter of 2018, marginally lower than the revised 0.8 percent turnover rate in the third quarter of last year.
Staff in the dietary departments also tend to have high turnover rates, Ippolito said, as staff are often students working part time as a pre-college or college job.
Mineralisation rates and turnover rates were correlated with several soil parameters (Table 2).
After five years, at the start of a second term, the effect actually reverses, and the turnover rate is noticeably lower for career civil servants in those years relative to all others.
Employment gains in the agriculture sector were more than 'quadruple of the labor turnover rate (1.02 percent) registered in the same period last year,' the PSA said.
The turnover rate equates to about 23,000 drivers; of that pool, a subset of 11,000 drivers were hired and quit in 2015, the majority leaving within their first three months.
She identified lower turnover rates and higher sales growth in organizations that emphasize high skills, employee participation in decision making and incentives such as good wages and job security.
"Given these universal reasons, there is a strong case for high employee turnover rates in the UAE this year, especially with analysts predicting strong salary growth and better performance across core sectors in 2014," he said.
He claimed that the achievement of three consecutive years of trade turnover rates of over EUR 3 B spoke well of the efforts of companies, diplomatic services in charge of trade and economic affairs, and other institutions, both Bulgarian and Romanian, which had contributed to the favorable statistics.
As with job turnover, worker turnover rates exhibit significant variation across industries.
Evidence of a "culture of turnover" in New Zealand, more commonly associated with industries staffed by low-skilled workers, is the unsettling conclusion of a study into nurse turnover rates, published in the Journal of Nursing Management this year.
"The turnover rates were going down during the recession," he said.