intraparietal sulcus

(redirected from Turner sulcus)

in·tra·pa·ri·e·tal sul·cus

[TA]
a horizontal sulcus extending back from the postcentral sulcus over some distance, then dividing perpendicularly into two branches so as to form, with the postcentral sulcus, a figure H. It divides the parietal lobe into superior and inferior parietal lobules.

intraparietal sulcus

[-perī′ətəl]
Etymology: L, intra + paries, wall, sulcus, groove
an irregular groove on the convex surface of the parietal lobe that marks the division of the inferior and superior parietal lobules of the cerebrum. Also called interparietal fissure.

in·tra·pa·ri·e·tal sul·cus

(in'tră-păr-ī'ĕ-tăl sŭl'kŭs) [TA]
A horizontal sulcus extending back from the postcentral sulcus over some distance, then dividing perpendicularly into two branches so as to form, with the postcentral sulcus, the letter H. It divides the parietal lobe into superior and inferior parietal lobules.

intraparietal sulcus

A groove branching from the postcentral sulcus and running transversely and posteriorly along the lateral surface of the parietal lobe of the brain. It divides the posterior portion of the parietal lobe into two parts, the superior and the inferior parietal lobules.
See also: sulcus
References in classic literature ?
Turtle, salmon, tautog, woodcock, boiled turkey, South-Down mutton, pig, roast-beef, have vanished, or exist only in fragments, with lukewarm potatoes, and gravies crusted over with cold fat.
At last extinguishing the fire, he took the idol up very unceremoniously, and bagged it again in his grego pocket as carelessly as if he were a sportsman bagging a dead woodcock.
During their games, their bounds, while rivalling each other in beauty, brightness, and velocity, I distinguished the green labre; the banded mullet, marked by a double line of black; the round-tailed goby, of a white colour, with violet spots on the back; the Japanese scombrus, a beautiful mackerel of these seas, with a blue body and silvery head; the brilliant azurors, whose name alone defies description; some banded spares, with variegated fins of blue and yellow; the woodcocks of the seas, some specimens of which attain a yard in length; Japanese salamanders, spider lampreys, serpents six feet long, with eyes small and lively, and a huge mouth bristling with teeth; with many other species.
For them the earliest salmon is caught in our eastern rivers, and the shy woodcock stains the dry leaves with his blood in his remotest haunts, and the turtle comes from the far Pacific Islands to be gobbled up in soup.
But we are more like to hawk at the Spanish woodcock than at the French heron, though certes it is rumored that Du Guesclin with all the best lances of France have taken service under the lions and towers of Castile.
John, bringing home winged game, another hares or rabbits, and another hunting on marshy ground and almost nightly catching woodcocks or snipes.