Turing test

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Turing test

A test of artificial intelligence devised by UK mathematician, Alan Turing, who predicted in 1950 that by 2000, a computer could be programmed so that after 5 minutes of questioning, the average interrogator would not have more than a 70% chance of telling whether he or she was talking to a machine or a human. The state of AI has advanced to the degree that for the 2010 Loebner Prize—a platform for Turing Tests—the interaction time was increased to 25 minutes.
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For this reason we propose a stronger version of the original Turing test.
Such superficial solutions have been a prominent approach to the traditional Turing test going back to the ELIZA program written in the 1960's (Weizenbaum 1966).
While judges' correct responses varied across characters, for each visual Turing test, fewer than 25 percent of judges performed significantly better than chance in assessing whether a machine or a human produced a given set of symbols.
The CAPTCHA relay attack is also called Automated Turing Test relay attack in (Van & Stubblebine, 2006) and "stealing cycles from humans" (Kopsell & Hilling, 2004).
Given the attraction of electronic delivery, you'd think somebody would be offering an e-reader that provides an experience that is nearly indistinguishable from print, with the economies of electronic delivery, a kind of Turing test for e-readers: reliable replacement for print products; color display; compatibility with the de facto electronic document format, Adobe PDF; printing (to paper or PDF) for offline viewing, while costing less than paper.
That paper is the basis of the so-called Turing Test for the ability of a machine to demonstrate intelligence.
While the Turing Test is content to see if specific differences can or cannot be accurately identified rather than how this is done, I would suggest that implicit in these tests is the belief that different types of "others," think/ process "meanings" differently and hence respond differently.
It's true that if machines pass--or people fail--the Turing Test, and human beings and computers shake hands on the common ground of the algorithm, there may be little for a humanist to celebrate.
8] In fact, other limited Turing tests have been carried out as well.
The Turing test challenge has not yet been met (Watson, Siri, and systems succeeding in "restricted Turing tests" notwithstanding), and the relevance of the Turing test to establishing the intelligence of computers has been widely, and interestingly, debated for decades.