Turing test

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Turing test

A test of artificial intelligence devised by UK mathematician, Alan Turing, who predicted in 1950 that by 2000, a computer could be programmed so that after 5 minutes of questioning, the average interrogator would not have more than a 70% chance of telling whether he or she was talking to a machine or a human. The state of AI has advanced to the degree that for the 2010 Loebner Prize—a platform for Turing Tests—the interaction time was increased to 25 minutes.
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The CAPTCHA relay attack is also called Automated Turing Test relay attack in (Van & Stubblebine, 2006) and "stealing cycles from humans" (Kopsell & Hilling, 2004).
Machines that pass Turing Tests operate with sets of rules so they can appear human--one machine even was programmed to make typing "mistakes" in order to appear more human.
This automatic system detects anomalies, verifies the source using methods such as sender intention verification and VoIP Turing tests, and protects against multiple threats while dramatically reducing false positive and negatives; * Network level intelligence which correlates events in real-time from different parts of the network for immediate protection of elements against distributed attacks; and * Automatic and user controlled handling of VoIP SPAM.