Turing test


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Turing test

A test of artificial intelligence devised by UK mathematician, Alan Turing, who predicted in 1950 that by 2000, a computer could be programmed so that after 5 minutes of questioning, the average interrogator would not have more than a 70% chance of telling whether he or she was talking to a machine or a human. The state of AI has advanced to the degree that for the 2010 Loebner Prize—a platform for Turing Tests—the interaction time was increased to 25 minutes.
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It is, frankly, sad to see the Turing test besmirched by its inappropriate application as a challenge problem for AI.
Humphrys M (2009) How my program passed the Turing test.
Powers of the Facsimile: A Turing Test on Science and Literature.
As it happens, the Turing test has never been used to determine the presence of consciousness.
Incidentally, the Loebner Prize uses text-only interaction, remaining faithful to the Turing Test conditions of anonymity, but also privileging textual performance over visual representation.
This is not easily identifiable to judges in the short 5-minute sessions of the Turing Test.
artificial intelligence by devising his Turing Test.
In the Turing test, a computer is supposed to convince a human interlocutor that it's human.
The Turing Test - that a machine can be regarded as intelligent if it can't be distinguished from a human being in conversation - is still a benchmark for software developers.
Often skewed by our anthropomorphic bias, the Turing test asks a human observer to differentiate by conversation, a computer from another human.
Essentially, the Turing test involved engaging unseen human and machine participants in a text-based conversation.