Turing test


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Turing test

A test of artificial intelligence devised by UK mathematician, Alan Turing, who predicted in 1950 that by 2000, a computer could be programmed so that after 5 minutes of questioning, the average interrogator would not have more than a 70% chance of telling whether he or she was talking to a machine or a human. The state of AI has advanced to the degree that for the 2010 Loebner Prize—a platform for Turing Tests—the interaction time was increased to 25 minutes.
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Earlier, with tongue in cheek, I suggested our society needs a "spiritual" Turing test for distinguishing white nationalists from the rest of society.
The apparent absence of any need for entities online to pass a Turing test is perhaps indicative of a diminution of social investment in legitimacy predicated on humanist ideals, human subjectivity, notions of the 'authentic' self, or 'real' contact, whatever such terms were originally intended to designate.
After having been introduced to such a seemingly soulful machine, readers become eager for the results of the Turing test between the graduate student and the machine.
Parsing the turing test. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.
The Turing test has been updated many times, so it is not unrealistic that the test in Ex Machina should be different from the original.
Below is an unedited excerpt of one of the 30 sessions Ultra Hal has had with one of the Turing Test Judges this past weekend.
artificial intelligence by devising his Turing Test. A machine could be described
The invited papers discuss integrating planning and reasoning into an architecture that enables model-driven development, and the challenges of social robotics from the Turing test to science fiction.
In the Turing test, a computer is supposed to convince a human interlocutor that it's human.
The Turing Test - that a machine can be regarded as intelligent if it can't be distinguished from a human being in conversation - is still a benchmark for software developers.
In the sixty years since Alan Turing's "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" appeared in Mind, there have been two widely-accepted interpretations of the Turing test: the canonical behaviorist interpretation (namely, Turing's imitation game provides a definition, or logically sufficient condition, of intelligence in terms of behavior or behavioral dispositions) and the rival inductive or epistemic interpretation (namely, the game provides evidence of intelligence).
Often skewed by our anthropomorphic bias, the Turing test asks a human observer to differentiate by conversation, a computer from another human.