Turing test


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Turing test

A test of artificial intelligence devised by UK mathematician, Alan Turing, who predicted in 1950 that by 2000, a computer could be programmed so that after 5 minutes of questioning, the average interrogator would not have more than a 70% chance of telling whether he or she was talking to a machine or a human. The state of AI has advanced to the degree that for the 2010 Loebner Prize—a platform for Turing Tests—the interaction time was increased to 25 minutes.
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It is, frankly, sad to see the Turing test besmirched by its inappropriate application as a challenge problem for AI.
Humphrys M (2009) How my program passed the Turing test.
Powers of the Facsimile: A Turing Test on Science and Literature.
As it happens, the Turing test has never been used to determine the presence of consciousness.
Incidentally, the Loebner Prize uses text-only interaction, remaining faithful to the Turing Test conditions of anonymity, but also privileging textual performance over visual representation.
This is not easily identifiable to judges in the short 5-minute sessions of the Turing Test.
artificial intelligence by devising his Turing Test.
Enter the CAPTCHA, or Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart.
In the Turing test, a computer is supposed to convince a human interlocutor that it's human.
The Turing Test - that a machine can be regarded as intelligent if it can't be distinguished from a human being in conversation - is still a benchmark for software developers.
Often skewed by our anthropomorphic bias, the Turing test asks a human observer to differentiate by conversation, a computer from another human.
Essentially, the Turing test involved engaging unseen human and machine participants in a text-based conversation.