turbinate

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turbinate

 [ter´bĭ-nāt]
1. shaped like a top; called also turbinal.
2. a nasal concha.

tur·bi·nate

(tŭr'bi-nāt),
A bone shaped like a child's toy top, especially referring to turbinated bones. See: inferior nasal concha, middle nasal concha, superior nasal concha, supreme nasal concha.

turbinate

/tur·bi·nate/ (-nāt)
1. shaped like a top.
2. any of the nasal conchae.

turbinate

(tûr′bə-nĭt, -nāt′)
adj. also turbinated (-nā′tĭd)
1. Shaped like a top.
2. Anatomy Of, relating to, or designating a small curved bone that extends horizontally along the lateral wall of the nasal passage in mammals and birds.
n. (-nāt′)
Anatomy A turbinate bone.

turbinate

[tur′binit]
Etymology: L, turbinum, top-shaped
1 pertaining to a scroll shape.
2 pertaining to the concha nasalis.

tur·bi·nate

(tŭr'bi-nāt)
1. Shaped like a top.
[L. turbinatus, shaped like a top]

turbinate

(of plant parts) shaped like an inverted cone.

Turbinate

Ridge-shaped cartilage or soft bony tissue inside the nose.
Mentioned in: Nasal Packing

turbinal, turbinate

1. shaped like a top.
2. turbinate bone (concha nasalis ossea).
References in periodicals archive ?
Pneumatization of the inferior turbinate, or concha bullosa of the inferior turbinate, is clinically significant when it causes persistent nasal airway obstruction.
Considering that many Americans spend tens of thousands of dollars on doctors' visits and allergy medications throughout their lifetime, in addition to the time spent administering and refilling those medications, a quick 15-minute Coblation-Assisted Turbinate Reduction procedure is a welcome alternative.
In turbinate reduction procedures, this lower-temperature technique allows for removal of target tissue without damaging surrounding tissue or altering the critically important nasal mucosal lining - preserving normal nasal function and leaving facial growth unaffected.
Enlarged turbinates and nasal congestion can impair normal breathing, force patients to breathe through the mouth and turn the simple acts of eating, drinking, and speaking into an annoying and sometimes painful experience.
Coblation-Channeling, a relatively painless, minimally invasive surgical procedure, is performed on the enlarged turbinates under local anesthesia, often in a physician's office.
The finding paralleled anatomical clinical nasal findings and those of patients' VAS scores for nasal turbinate obstruction, suggesting increased airway size may improve ease of CPAP use.
Such procedures may include turbinate surgery for nasal obstructions, Coblation-channeling procedures for airway obstructions, and tonsillectomies.
Pneumatized structures are common anatomic nasal and sinus findings, the most common of which is a concha bullosa of the middle turbinate.
Recently, many studies have demonstrated that microdebrider-assisted turbinate reduction (MATR) is superior to other techniques for the surgical treatment of hypertrophic inferior turbinates.
The preferred location of this opening is roughly anterior and superior to the attachment of the middle turbinate where the bone is thinner.
The right middle turbinate was gently displaced medially, which allowed for visualization of the marked drainage from the right maxillary sinus flowing into the middle meatus (figure, C).