Turban Tumour

A form of cylindroma—a sweat gland tumour common on the scalp—which appears as a large, red-pink, usually hairless tumour with a bossellated surface which may grow to 50 cm or more and cover the head in a turban-like fashion
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The breakthrough, announced in Nature journal, came after scientists found that a rare inherited skin cancer called turban tumour syndrome is caused when inflammation in the tissue becomes over-active.
Turban tumour syndrome causes huge mushroom-shaped tumours to grow out of the scalp and other hairy parts of the body.
In the case of turban tumour syndrome we think anti-inflammatory drugs could be rubbed into tumours in gel form to shrink them.
Scientists have found that a rare inherited cancer called turban tumour syndrome can be triggered by an over-active inflammatory response, part of the body's defence system.
British and Greek researchers, who reported their findings in the journal Nature, plan to use this property of aspirin to treat turban tumour syndrome.
Team leader Professor Alan Ashworth, from Cancer Research UK's gene function and regulation group at the Institute of Cancer Research, said: 'We believe over-active, uncontrolled inflammation could be a common factor in turban tumour syndrome and a number of other cancers.
Turban tumour syndrome, known medically as cylindromatosis, causes huge mushroomshaped tumours to grow out of the scalp and other hairy parts of the body.
Inflammation is also thought to be a factor in forms of cancer such as the rare turban tumour syndrome, a skin cancer which causes huge mushroom-shaped tumours on hairy parts of the body.
Sufferers of turban tumour have a faulty CYLD gene, which causes the body's natural inflammation response to overwork.
The breakthrough, announced in the journal Nature, came after scientists found that a rare inherited skin cancer called turban tumour syndrome is caused when inflammation in the tissue becomes over-active.