tunic

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tunic

 [too´nik]
a covering or coat; see tunica.
Bichat's tunic tunica intima.

tu·nic

(tū'nik),
Coat or covering; one of the enveloping layers of a part, especially one of the coats of a blood vessel or other tubular structure.
See also: layer.
Synonym(s): tunica
[L. tunica]

tunic

(to͞o′nĭk, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1.
a. A loose-fitting garment, sleeved or sleeveless, extending to the knees and worn especially in ancient Greece and Rome.
b. A medieval surcoat.
2. A long, plain, close-fitting jacket, usually having a stiff high collar and worn as part of a uniform.
3. A loose-fitting, pullover, collarless shirt that falls to the hip or thigh and is often drawn in at the waist and worn over leggings or pants.
4. Anatomy A coat or layer enveloping an organ or part.
5. Botany A loose membranous outer covering of a bulb or corm, as of an onion, tulip, or crocus.
6. See tunicle.

tu·nic

(tū'nik)
Coat or covering; one of the enveloping layers of a part, especially one of the coats of a blood vessel or other tubular structure.
Synonym(s): tunica.
[L. tunica]

tunic

the thin dry, papery covering of a BULB or CORM.

tunic

a covering or coat. See also tunica.

abdominal tunic
see tunica flava abdominis.
Bichat's tunic
tunica intima.
References in classic literature ?
Robin had not forgot the gentle arts taught by his mother, and he wore his fine red velvet tunic and breeches with the grace of a courtier.
At this moment the tapestry moved aside, and a Nubian, black as ebony, and dressed in a plain white tunic, made a sign to his master that all was prepared in the dining-room.
They were clothed in a sort of tunic of light cloth which reached to the knees.
So he seized a loaf when no one was looking and stowed it away under his tunic.
Sancho Panza, who was coming on close behind puffing and blowing, seeing him fall, cried out to his assailant not to strike him again, for he was poor enchanted knight, who had never harmed anyone all the days of his life; but what checked the clown was, not Sancho's shouting, but seeing that Don Quixote did not stir hand or foot; and so, fancying he had killed him, he hastily hitched up his tunic under his girdle and took to his heels across the country like a deer.
Her head and neck, shoulders, ears, arms, hands, and toes were loaded down with jewels and gems with bracelets, earrings, and rings; while a tunic bordered with gold, and covered with a light muslin robe, betrayed the outline of her form.
He was a slight creature--perhaps four feet high--clad in a purple tunic, girdled at the waist with a leather belt.
As she spoke Minerva touched him with her wand and covered him with wrinkles, took away all his yellow hair, and withered the flesh over his whole body; she bleared his eyes, which were naturally very fine ones; she changed his clothes and threw an old rag of a wrap about him, and a tunic, tattered, filthy, and begrimed with smoke; she also gave him an undressed deer skin as an outer garment, and furnished him with a staff and a wallet all in holes, with a twisted thong for him to sling it over his shoulder.
We were not very early risers--the sun would be shooting his golden spikes above the Happar mountain, ere I threw aside my tappa robe, and girding my long tunic about my waist, sallied out with Fayaway and Kory-Kory, and the rest of the household, and bent my steps towards the stream.
When I had come upon him he was clothed in rough sadak sandals, a gee-string and a tunic fashioned from the shaggy hide of a thag.
He was clothed in tight-fitting nether garments and a loose, sleeveless tunic that fell just below his hips, while his feet were shod in soft-soled sandals, the wrappings of which extended halfway to his knees, closely resembling a modern spiral military legging.
His tiny surcoat of scarlet velvet was rich with embroidery, while beneath was a close-fitting tunic of white silk.