TULIP

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TULIP

TULIP

Transurethral laser-induced prostatectomy, see there.

incision

(in-sizh'on) [L. incisio, a cut]
A cut made with a knife, electrosurgical unit, or laser, esp. for surgical purposes.

coronal incision

1. An incision made across the scalp in a plane that separates the front (anterior portion) of the head from the back (posterior portion).
2. A crown-shaped incision.

limbal relaxing incision

Abbreviation: LRI
A surgical treatment for astigmatism in which the cornea is reshaped by placing small cuts in its periphery (the limbus of the cornea). These incisions make the misshapen cornea more spherical, which improves visual clarity.

McBurney incision

See: McBurney, Charles

paramedian incision

A surgical incision, esp. of the abdominal wall, close to the midline.

Pfannenstiel incision

See: Pfannenstiel incision

relaxing incision

A second incision made during surgery to promote drainage, relieve the tension on a wound as it is sutured, or facilitate mobilization of a sliding tissue flap.
Synonym: counterincision; counteropening.

transurethral laser incision of the prostate

Abbreviation: TULIP
The treatment of prostatic hyperplasia with a laser used as a cutting instrument. The laser is inserted into the penile urethra and directed at the diseased portion of the gland.

transurethral laser incision of the prostate

Abbreviation: TULIP
The treatment of prostatic hyperplasia with a laser used as a cutting instrument. The laser is inserted into the penile urethra and directed at the diseased portion of the gland.
See also: incision

tulip

the horticultural tulip—see tulipa. For Cape and Natal tulip see homeria.
References in classic literature ?
Boxtel at once pictured to himself this learned man, with a capital of four hundred thousand and a yearly income of ten thousand guilders, devoting all his intellectual and financial resources to the cultivation of the tulip.
And now if Van Baerle produced a new tulip, and named it the John de Witt, after having named one the Cornelius?
Long, hot summers can encourage tulips to give an encore the next year
The tulips we grow have been bred over hundreds of years to give a broad and glamorous range of blooms.
Tulips, alongside hyacinths, roses, narcissi and carnations, were held up as sacred flowers and it was thought paradise would be full of them.
Tulips are an established sight in British gardens, adding a much-needed splash of colour
Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality Mayor Kadir TopbaE- said they planted around 30 million of tulips to various locations of Istanbul.
These wild tulips have been growing in the area for centuries, according to local experts, and the tulips, that first blossom at the beginning of March, and are now in full bloom.
But those hybrids are softies compared to their wild ancestors -- species tulips growing in unforgiving sites from Algeria to China.
These wonderful "broken" tulips - responsible for tulip mania in 17th-century Netherlands and, ultimately, for the collapse of the tulip trade - were the result of a virus.
All of us are working together and we have added more varieties of tulips to put together a breathtaking garden," said a farmer, Nizar Khan.