tuber

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tuber

 [too´ber]
1. a swelling or protuberance; see also tubercle and tuberosity.
2. the essential lesion of tuberous sclerosis, a pale, firm, nodular glial hamartomatous brain lesion that sometimes becomes calcified; it develops predominantly in the cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum, medulla, and spinal cord.
tuber cine´reum an area of the undersurface of the forebrain to which the stalk of the pituitary gland is attached.

tu·ber

, pl.

tu·ber·a

(tū'bĕr, too'ber-ă),
1. A localized swelling; a knob.
2. A short, fleshy, thick, underground stem of plants, such as the potato.
[L. protuberance, swelling]

tuber

/tu·ber/ (too´ber) pl. tu´bera, tubers   [L.]
1. a swelling or protuberance.
2. the essential lesion of tuberous sclerosis, presenting as a pale, firm, nodular, phakomalike glial hamartomatous brain lesion.

tuber cine´reum  a layer of gray matter forming part of the floor of the third ventricle, to which the infundibulum of the hypothalamus is attached.

tuber

[t(y)o̅o̅′bər]
a knoblike localized swelling.

tuber

An enlarged tip of a rhizome or a fleshy outgrowth, which stores nutrients.

Edible tubers
Stem tubers (potato); tuberous roots (sweet potato, cassava, yam, dahlia).

tu·ber

, pl. tubera (tū'bĕr, -ă)
1. A localized swelling; a knob.
2. A short, fleshy, thick, underground stem of plants, such as the potato.
[L. protuberance, swelling]

tuber

an enlarged underground root or stem containing PARENCHYMA cells packed with STARCH for overwintering. The best known example is the stem tuber of potato which has buds in the axils of tiny leaves (forming the potato ‘eyes’). Root tubers often have a finger-like branched structure, as in the lesser celandine, Ranunculus ficaria.

tuber

1. a swelling or protuberance, especially on a bone.
2. a short, thick, fleshy, underground stem carrying a number of buds each capable of growing into a new plant, e.g. potato. A storage phase of plant growth.

tuber calcaneus, tuber calcis
the point of the hock that serves as the attachment for the gastrocnemius tendon.
tuber cinereum
a mound on the undersurface of the forebrain to which the stalk of the pituitary gland is attached.
tuber coxae, coxal tuber
the point of the hip; the most lateral point of the ilium.
facial tuber
the anterior point on the facial crest, just above the third and fourth cheek teeth of the horse. A homologous point in the cow.
tuber ischii
the caudal point on the floor of the pubis, the tuber ischium or pin bone.
sacral tuber
the most medial prominence on the ilium; above the sacroiliac joint.
tuber scapulae
supraglenoid tubercle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The plant is a simple creeper producing tubers from the nodes buried in the soil.
2005), but there has been no research seeking to estimate the physiological stage of tubers using the thermal sum method.
The findings indicated that the nursery substrate for producing seedling tubers must be sufficient in organic matter and water holding capacity with adequate drainage and low proportion of clay to avoid compaction.
The major part of potatoes consumed by the processing industry is tubers from store.
them After a couple of weeks, lightly brush off any dried soil that is sticking to the tubers and dust them with yellow sulphur to discourage mould and mildew.
The observation on tuber per plant indicates that vermicompost and neem cake also gave better performance in formation of tubers per plant when applied alone and combination with Trichoderma harzianum.
6--Specific gravity of potato tubers was determined using the method of [15].
In both studies, 11-day drought cycles were applied before tuber formation and again 10 days after tuber formation began.
To increase the production and availability of yam during off-season, PhilRootcrops-VSU initiated a project titled, "Improvement of Yam Production System through Tissue Culture Derived Plantlets and Microtubers and Breaking Tuber Dormancy for Continuous Production of Planting Materials".
New research shows that potatoes--often cultivated as a rainfed crop with little or no irrigation--are still the go-to tuber when times get tough.
1 tons ha-1 of tubers respectively during the year 2012 (FAO, 2013).