tubercle

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tubercle

 [too´ber-k'l]
1. a nodule or small eminence, especially one on a bone, for attachment of a tendon; see also tuber and tuberosity. Called also tuberculum. adj., adj tuber´cular, tuber´culate.
2. a small, rounded nodule produced by the bacillus of tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis). It is made up of small spherical cells that contain giant cells and are surrounded by spindle-shaped epithelioid cells.
fibrous tubercle a tubercle of bacillary origin that contains connective tissue elements.
Ghon tubercle Ghon focus.
mental tubercle a prominence on the inner border of either side of the mental protuberance of the mandible.
miliary tubercle one of the many minute tubercles formed in many organs in acute miliary tuberculosis.
pubic tubercle a prominent tubercle at the lateral end of the pubic crest.
supraglenoid tubercle one on the scapula for attachment of the long head of the biceps muscle.

tu·ber·cle

(tū'bĕr-kĕl),
1. A nodule, especially in an anatomic, not pathologic, sense.
2. A circumscribed, rounded, solid elevation on the skin, mucous membrane, surface of an organ, or the surface of a bone, the latter giving attachment to a muscle or ligament.
3. dentistry a small elevation arising on the surface of a tooth. Synonym(s): tuberculum [TA]
4. A granulomatous lesion due to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although somewhat variable in size (0.5-3 mm in diameter) and in the proportions of various histologic components, tubercle's tend to be fairly well circumscribed, spheroid, firm lesions that usually consist of three irregularly outlined but moderately distinct zones: 1) an inner focus of necrosis, coagulative at first, which then becomes caseous; 2) a middle zone that consists of a fairly dense accumulation of large mononuclear phagocytes (macrophages), frequently arranged somewhat radially (with reference to the necrotic material) resembling an epithelium, and hence termed epithelioid cells; multinucleated giant cells of Langhans type may also be present; and 3) an outer zone of numerous lymphocytes, and a few monocytes and plasma cells. In instances in which healing has begun, a fourth zone of fibrous tissue may form at the periphery. Morphologically indistinguishable lesions may occur in diseases caused by other agents; many observers use the term nonspecifically, that is, with reference to any such granuloma; other clinicians use tubercle only for tuberculous lesions, and then designate those of undetermined causes as epithelioid-cell granulomas.
[L. tuberculum, dim. of tuber, a knob, a swelling, a tumor]

tubercle

(to͞o′bər-kəl)
n.
1. An anatomical nodule.
2. A small elevation on the surface of a tooth.
3. A nodule or swelling, especially a mass of lymphocytes and epithelioid cells forming the characteristic granulomatous lesion of tuberculosis.

tubercle

Medtalk Bump, lump, nodule, protuberance, especially on a bone

tu·ber·cle

(tū'bĕr-kĕl)
1. A nodule, especially in an anatomic, not pathologic, sense.
Synonym(s): tuberculum (1) [TA] .
2. A circumscribed, rounded, solid elevation on the skin, mucous membrane, or surface of an organ.
3. A slight elevation from the surface of a bone giving attachment to a muscle or ligament.
4. dentistry A small elevation arising on the surface of a tooth.
5. A granulomatous lesion due to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although somewhat variable in size (0.5-3 mm in diameter) and in the proportions of various histologic components, tubercles tend to be fairly well-circumscribed, spheroid, firm lesions that usually consist of three zones: 1) an inner focus of necrosis, coagulative at first and then becoming caseous; 2) a middle zone that consists of large mononuclear phagocytes (macrophages), frequently arranged somewhat radially (with reference to the necrotic material), resembling an epithelium and hence termed epithelioid cells; multinucleated giant cells of Langhans type may also be present; and 3) an outer zone of numerous lymphocytes and a few monocytes and plasma cells. In instances in which healing has begun, a fourth zone of fibrous tissue may form at the periphery. Morphologically indistinguishable lesions may occur in diseases caused by other agents; many observers use the term nonspecifically, i.e., with reference to any such granuloma; others use "tubercle" only for tuberculous lesions and designate those of undetermined causes as epithelioid-cell granulomas.
[L. tuberculum, dim. of tuber, a knob, a swelling, a tumor]

tubercle

1. A small nodular mass of tubercular tissue.
2. An informal term for TUBERCULOSIS.
3. Any small, rounded protrusion on a bone.

tubercle

a spherical or ovoid swelling.

tu·ber·cle

(tū'bĕr-kĕl)
1. [TA] In dentistry, a small elevation arising on the surface of a tooth.
2. [TA] A nodule, especially in an anatomic, not pathologic, sense.
3. Circumscribed, rounded, solid elevation on skin, mucous membrane, surface of an organ, or bone surface, the last giving attachment to a muscle or ligament.
4. A granulomatous lesion due to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
[L. tuberculum, dim. of tuber, a knob, a swelling, a tumor]
References in periodicals archive ?
pennsylvanicus in number of plantar tubercles and pelage as described by Reich (1981), Gottschang (1981), Stalling (1990) and Schwartz and Schwartz (2001) and summarized in Table 1.
The largest tubercles, on the snout, about 120 micra high and 300 micra in diameter, are composed of several hundred cells, while the small tubercles on the pectoral fins are composed of about two dozen cells and are only 20-30 micra high.
The WEICan tests did not directly measure the engineering feasibility, or the tubercle fabrication durability, but focused on the performance of the new airfoil in a real world setting on a commercial turbine.
First and the foremost advantage of using these models is that these animals can be easily infected by pulmonary route as a result of few virulent tubercle bacilli get deposited in alveolar space in the same way humans acquire infection.
The experimental researches for two potatoes tubercles varieties, the oval DESIREE variety and the round PROCURA variety are presented.
The key, says Fish, is that tubercles disrupt the flow of water over the humpback's flipper, causing vortices in the layer of fluid closest to the fin's top surface.
Mention Montgomery's Tubercles and they'll go silent - running the name through their computer bank of pregnancy ailments, operations and oddities.
If, however, the body's resistance is low because of aging, infections such as HIV, malnutrition, or other factors, the bacilli may break out of the tubercles in the alveoli and cause active disease.
There appears to be the remnant of a ventral tubercle on all specimens.
"If the lungs were made as inactive as possible," he explains, "the walls of the tubercles, gradually thickening and strengthening, might seal the bacilli off, protecting the surrounding tissue from infection.