tsetse

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Related to Tsetse flies: Assassin Bugs

tsetse

 [tset´se]
an African fly of the genus Glossina, which transmits trypanosomiasis.

tset·se

(tset'sē, tsē'tsē),
Common name for bloodsucking flies of Africa. See: Glossina.
[S. African native name]

tsetse

/tset·se/ (tset´se) an African fly of the genus Glossina, which transmits trypanosomiasis.

Glos·si·na

(glos-ī'nă)
A genus of bloodsucking Diptera (tsetse flies) confined to Africa; they serve as vectors of the trypanosomes that cause African sleeping sickness.
[G. glōssa, tongue]

tsetse

an African fly of the genus glossina, which transmits trypanosomiasis.

tsetse fly disease
nagana.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the distribution of tsetse flies in Africa is well known, the researchers did not have maps of tabanids (horseflies, deer flies).
But just because a habitat is suitable for tsetse flies doesn't necessarily mean that they will be there all of the time, so the researchers developed a fly-movement model to identify potential tsetse distributions.
We were bitten numerous times by tsetse flies as we worked on the car, hoping that the biting flies weren't carrying African sleeping sicknesses.
The Assassin Bug, which spreads Chagas disease - a slow-progressing infection that can cause fatal heart disease and deform the intenstines - and Tsetse flies, which cause schistosomiasis, a chronic illness that can damage internal organs and, in children, impair growth and brain development.
THEY have been chased by elephants in Botswana, terrified by bush fires in Zambia and mauled by tsetse flies in Tanzania.
EARLY IN THE MORNING, we cut the spoor of 14 buffalo and tracked them through devastating heat and equally devastating swarms of tsetse flies for almost five miles.
Others include tsetse flies (sleeping sickness), sand flies (leishmaniasis), black flies (river blindness) and ticks (tick borne encephalitis and Lyme disease).
The new findings show how the parasite survives inside the gut of tsetse flies.
The organism is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in both human as well as domesticated animals (nagana) in widespread areas of Africa where the tsetse flies and the pathogen are endemic.
In Malawi he was beset by tsetse flies, causing him once again to doubt his own sanity, and in Mozambique he cycled on almost non-existent roads, and took to canoes, with his bike, when he needed to cross unbridged rivers.
However, it must be noted that not all tsetse flies carry the parasite, as a matter of fact the proportion infected is very low.
It was surrounded by rocky outcrops and besieged by tsetse flies.