tryptamine

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tryptamine

 [trip´tah-mēn]
a chemical product of the decarboxylation of tryptophan, causing vasoconstriction by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic nerve endings.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

trypt·a·mine

(trip'tă-mēn, -min),
A decarboxylation product of l-tryptophan that occurs in plants and certain foods (for example, cheese). It raises the blood pressure through vasoconstrictor action, by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings, and is believed to be one of the agents responsible for hypertensive episodes after therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (for example, pargyline hydrochloride).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tryptamine

(trĭp′tə-mēn′)
n.
1. A crystalline substance, C10H12N2, that is formed in plant and animal tissues from tryptophan and is an intermediate in various metabolic processes.
2. Any of various naturally occurring or synthetic derivatives of this compound, many of which have psychoactive properties.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tryp·ta·mine

(trip'tă-mēn, -min)
A decarboxylation product of l-tryptophan that occurs in plants and certain foods. It raises the blood pressure through vasoconstrictor action, by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings, and is believed to be one of the agents responsible for hypertensive episodes after therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, manifestation of very specific body vibrations said to be the classic kundalini symptoms (kundalini is a form of primal energy located at the base of the spine) are supposedly quite reliably induced with substances such as DPT (N,N-dipropyltryptamine) and 4-Acetoxy-DIPT (N,N-diisopropyl4-acetoxy-tryptamine), which are even more obscure psychedelic tryptamines than DMT (Cardena et al., 2015), but, at the molecular level, close relatives of it (Toad, 1999a; Toad, 1999b).
An additional alkaloid, DMT, is a tryptamine derivative similar to serotonin that is found in the leaves of P.
They are grouped into simple and compound tryptamines (also known as ergolines, lysergamides or ergot alkaloids).
Anderson et al., "Dimethyltryptamine and other hallucinogenic tryptamines exhibit substrate behavior at the serotonin uptake transporter and the vesicle monoamine transporter," Journal of Neural Transmission, vol.
From the evidence, psychedelics, and perhaps especially the tryptamines, let our kinship with other species, our entanglement in the vast 'web of life,' move from being a proposition of the biological sciences to something wondrously apparent, something internalised.
Among the website's products are Green-Beans - part of a group of chemicals known as tryptamines which drugs watchdogs recently warned should be classified Class A, placing it on a par with heroin.
Research suggests that sunlight improves moods as it stimulates the pineal gland in the brain to produce chemicals called tryptamines.
Some of these preparations are made by the admixture of extracted compounds like harmine plus DMT (pharmahuasca), while others are prepared with other botanical sources of [beta]-carbolines and tryptamines (anahuasca), like Peganum harmala [Syrian rue] seeds, a [beta]-carbolines source, in combination with the inner bark of Mimosa tenuiflora [jurema], a DMT-rich plant traditionally used in indigenous and syncretic rituals in Northeast Brazil (da Mota & Albuquerque 2002; Ott 1994).
The Meixner test in the detection of alpha-amanitin and false-positive reactions caused by psilocin and 5-substituted tryptamines. Ann Emerg Med 2004;44:114-20.
Chemically the members of the genus Sida contain [beta]-phenethylamines ([beta]-phenethylamine, ephedrine and [phi] ephedrine), quinazolines (vasicine, vasicinol and vasicinone) and carboxylated tryptamines in addition to choline and betaine [3].
phenylethylamines and tryptamines. One of these was MDMA (known commonly