TIL

(redirected from Truth in Lending)
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TIL

Abbreviation for tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes , under lymphocyte.

TIL

tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the bank examination process, the Federal Reserve enforces the federal banking laws, including the Truth in Lending rules, with respect to the approximately 980 state-chartered banks that are members of the Federal Reserve System.
The Fair Credit and Charge Card Disclosure Act of 1988 amended the Truth in Lending Act to require that the APR for credit card purchases and certain other costs be disclosed in direct mail and other solicitations and applications to open credit and charge card accounts.
1482 would expand the Truth in Lending disclosures required for credit and charge card advertising.
In addition, consumers are provided with complete Truth in Lending disclosures before they become obligated on the plan, and the Board by regulation has provided that if consumers are not given full disclosures beforehand, a consumer may reject the plan once disclosures are received (and any membership fee paid must be refunded).
The Congress enacted the Consumer Leasing Act in 1976 as an amendment to the Truth in Lending Act, based on findings that a trend toward long-term leasing existed as an alternative to purchasing certain consumer items on credit and that consumers were not receiving adequate leasing cost disclosures.
In 1980, the Truth in Lending Simplification Act amended the credit provisions of the Truth in Lending Act.
The bill would amend both the Truth in Lending Act and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) to require good faith estimates of costs in refinancings of home loans within three days after an application has been made.
Because a significant increase in compliance burden likely would result from enactment of the proposed amendments to the Truth in Lending Act, we believe that a clear need for additional legislation should be established before the Congress acts.
Critics contended the programs need stricter controls under the Truth in Lending Act and equated the fees with exorbitant interest rates on short-term loans.