Tropheryma whippelii

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Tro·pher·y·ma whip·pel·i·i

(trō-fer'i-mă wi-pel'ē-ī),
An unclassified, nonculturable organism, named in 1992, which has been identified by electron microscopy and defined by DNA amplification technologies; it has been proven to be the infectious agent responsible for Whipple disease.

Tropheryma whippelii

The causative bacillus of Whipple's disease, and some cases of uveitis Diagnosis Suspected is based on evidence with EM; confirmed by PCR to detect 16S ribosomal RNA gene–rDNA sequences of T whippelii; T whippelii has been isolated and cultivated by inoculation in a human fibroblast cell line, using a shell-vial assay. See Whipple's disease.
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felis (3-5,9); Coxiella burnetii (10); Tropheryma whipplei (11); and Borrelia spp.
Similarly, wholegenome sequence data have identified unique, multicopy, gene targets that increased the sensitivity of molecular diagnostic tests developed for other human pathogens, including Brucella spp, (82) Coxiella burnetii, (83) Tropheryma whipplei, (84,85) and Neisseria meningitidis.
A+ (8) Rubella A+ (1) SARS (coronavirus) A+ CCHL (1) CHL (1,3,8) Streptococcus ESR pneumoniae CCHL Toxoplasma gondii A+ CHL (1) Trichomonas APATH (1) vaginalis Tropheryma whipplei A+ Ureaplasma parvum APATH (1) Ureaplasma APATH (1) urealyticum Varicella zoster A+ (VZ) Waikato CCHL CHL (1,2) Whipple's disease (refer Tropheryma whipplei Additionally A+ (8) Bacterial species Pathogen Sample type Adenovirus Respiratory--nasopharyngeal swab or aspirate, sputum.
Tropheryma whipplei, and Coxiella burnetii in environmental samples and blood specimens from febrile patients in Senegal (3-6).
Immunohistochemical tests and polymerase chain reaction tests for 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Tropheryma whipplei are sensitive methods for the diagnosis of Whipple disease.
Tropheryma whipplei endocarditis differs from classic Whipple disease, which primarily affects the gastrointestinal system.
Several studies have assessed the effect of fastidious bacterial infections in systemic febrile illness, including Rickettsia felis (4-6), Coxiella burnetii (7), Tropheryma whipplei (3), and Borrelia spp.
To the Editor: Tropheryma whipplei causes Whipple disease, a rare multisystemic disorder that affects mainly middle-aged white men and is most widely distributed in Europe and North America (1).
Screening results from quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for Tropheryma whipplei were negative for blood, saliva, stools, urine, and lymph nodes.
Whipple disease, a rare sporadic disease, was first considered a metabolic disease (1) and later suspected to be an infectious disease caused by a rare bacterium, Tropheryma whipplei (2).
Tropheryma whipplei is a bacterium widely known to be associated with Whipple disease (WD), which is characterized by various clinical signs such as diarrhea, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, and polyarthritis (1).
Tropheryma whipplei is known mainly as the bacterial pathogen responsible for Whipple disease (1).