Tropheryma whippelii

Tro·pher·y·ma whip·pel·i·i

(trō-fer'i-mă wi-pel'ē-ī),
An unclassified, nonculturable organism, named in 1992, which has been identified by electron microscopy and defined by DNA amplification technologies; it has been proven to be the infectious agent responsible for Whipple disease.

Tropheryma whippelii

The causative bacillus of Whipple's disease, and some cases of uveitis Diagnosis Suspected is based on evidence with EM; confirmed by PCR to detect 16S ribosomal RNA gene–rDNA sequences of T whippelii; T whippelii has been isolated and cultivated by inoculation in a human fibroblast cell line, using a shell-vial assay. See Whipple's disease.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Brief report: uveitis caused by Tropheryma whippelii (Whipple's bacillus).
Biopsies returned positive for periodic acid-Schiff positive organisms consistent with Tropheryma whippelii and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction.
PCR against Tropheryma whippelii has facilitated diagnosis in recent years.
Another unculturable microbe that has been specifically detected by PCR and probe analysis is Tropheryma whippelii, the causative agent of Whipple disease [128, 172, 173].
Polymerase chain reaction analysis for diagnosis of Tropheryma whippelii infective endocarditis in two patients with no previous evidence of Whipple's disease.
An uncommon cause of recurrent strokes: Tropheryma whippelii endocarditis.
Tropheryma whippelii DNA in saliva of patients without Whipple's disease.
60,61) Whipple disease, infection by Tropheryma whippelii, almost always involves the small intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes and causes pericarditis in 75%, endocarditis in 50%, myocardial fibrosis in 10%, and myocarditis in 1% of cases.
The bacteria were thus classified within the family Actinomycetes (classification was based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis), and the name Tropheryma whippelii was proposed (5,6); the bacterium was later modified to Tropheryma whipplei by La Scola et al.
Culture and immunological detection of Tropheryma whippelii from the duodenum of a patient with Whipple disease.
14) The causative agent is a soil-borne gram-positive bacillus Tropheryma whippelii.