trochanter

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Related to Trochanters: Trochanteric fossa

trochanter

 [tro-kan´ter]
a broad, flat process on the femur, at the upper end of its lateral surface (greater trochanter), or a short conical process on the posterior border of the base of its neck (lesser trochanter). adj., adj trochanter´ic, trochanter´ian.
Position of greater and lesser trochanter on the femur and patella. From Applegate, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tro·chan·ter

(trō-kan'tĕr),
One of the bony prominences developed from independent osseous centers near the proximal end of the femur; there are two in humans, three in horses.
[G. trochantēr, a runner, fr. trechō, to run]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

trochanter

(trō-kăn′tər)
n.
1. Any of several bony processes on the upper part of the femur of many vertebrates.
2. The second proximal segment of the leg of an insect.

tro·chan′ter·al, tro′chan·ter′ic (trō′kən-tĕr′ĭk, -kăn-) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tro·chan·ter

(trō-kan'tĕr) [TA]
One of the bony prominences developed from independent osseous centers near the upper extremity of the femur; there are two in humans, three in horses.
[G. trochantēr, a runner, fr. trechō, to run]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

trochanter

One of two major bony processes, the greater and lesser trochanters, on the upper part of the FEMUR. Muscle tendons are attached to the trochanters.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

trochanter

  1. (in insects) the second segment from the base of the leg.
  2. (in vertebrates) one of several large processes near the head of the femur to which muscles are attached.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(2011): characters 21 (presence of stridulating setae on the trochanters) and 22 (presence of stridulating setae on the coxae) were inactivated as they didn't distinguish different types of setae (see Results, below).
A straight lateral incision was made from the greater trochanter and extended distally along the thigh.
The three other quads attach around the greater trochanter of the femur and just below it;
palaestinensis hairs on eyes sparse and short dense and long postocular area in as broad as 1/3 of as broad as as broad dorsal view scape is long as 1/2 of scape is long scape and pedicel pale brown black long additional hairs yellowish white black on scutum trochanters yellow black, yellow apically scutellar spines as long as V4 of as long as /4 of scutellum scutellum both ends of tibiae broadly yellow narrowly pale brown aedeagal complex as in Fig.
Legs black above, dark brown ventrally, fore coxae brown, all trochanters brown ventrally.
Several studies have shown problems with this implant, (44,60) as it causes three-point loading on the trochanter and femoral cortices leading to intraoperative and postoperative fractures.
Typical results of [T.sub.c][PO.sub.2] and [T.sub.c][PCO.sub.2] levels measured at the greater trochanter during the operation are illustrated for two subjects (Figures 3 and 4).
* S -- Shenton's line (or Shenton's curve): Runs from the top of the obturator foremen and the medial cortex of the femoral neck to the lesser trochanter. Any break in continuity of the smooth curve suggests hip displacement or dislocation.[3]
All of one type, I - IV measuring 116 (98-115), 96 (91-103), 98 (83-105) and 103 (86-110) inlength respectively (Trochanter base to tarsus tip).
Female paratype (MCZ 78876) in mm, length/width (length/ width ratio in parentheses): Leg I: trochanter 0.28/0.24 (1.17), femur 0.89/0.27 (3.30), patella 0.45/0.26 (1.73), tibia 0.59/0.22 (2.68), metatarsus 0.35/0.18 (1.94), tarsus 0.61/0.29 (2.10), total 3.17.
Chaetotaxy of palp as follows: trochanter none; basifemur with one simple seta; telofemur with one uncinate apophysis and one simple seta; genu with one spine like seta and two simple setae; tibiotarsus with 4 simple setae, one thick spine like seta and terminating in a small claw (Fig.
This species is recognized by having the coxae, trochanters, basal third of femora, head dorsally, and bucculae yellow, antennal segment IV dark brown, and hemelytral membrane dark brown with hyaline apex digitiform, extending toward the center of the membrane.