Tritrichomonas

Tritrichomonas

(trī-trik'ō-mō'nas),
A genus of parasitic protozoan flagellates, formerly part of the genus Trichomonas but now separated as a distinct genus by the absence of a pelta and the presence of three anterior flagella. Species include Tritrichomonas foetus, which causes bovine trichomoniasis, and Tritrichomonas suis, which occurs in the nasal passages, stomach, cecum, and colon of pigs.
See also: Trichomonas.
[G. tri-, three, + Trichomonas]
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of prokaryote inhibitors (such as antibiotics) to control bacterial growth in cultures of planktonic organisms began in the 1940s, when penicillin was used to obtain bacteria-free cultures of the protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus (Riedmuller, 1928) (Ithaca & Mahmoud, 1944), and their use increased after the discovery of streptomycin in 1943, tetracycline in 1945 and neomycin in 1949.
Direct sequencing and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that the isolate of the flagellated trichomonad identified from this investigation is more phylogenetically related to H meleagridis than Tetratrichomonas gallinarum, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Dientamoeba fragilis.
Comparison of the diagnostic sensitivity of a commercially available culture kit and a diagnostic culture test using Diamond's media for diagnosing Tritrichomonas foetus in bulls.
Observations on the fertilization and development of preimplantation bovine embryos in vitro in the presence of Tritrichomonas foetus.
Tritrichomonas foetus, agent of bovine trichomonosis, was recently recognized as a primary cause of feline trichomoniasis, a large bowel disease characterized by intermittent or chronic diarrhea mainly occurring in multihoused cats from catteries or shelters [1-3].
Some notable species of trichomonads include Tritrichomonas foetus, Trichomonas gallinae, and Trichomonas vaginalis.
histolytica, as well as other amitochondriate protists (e.g., Tritrichomonas, Trichomonas, and Giardia), requires particularly high amounts of extracellular iron in vitro (~100 [micro]M), surpassing that of the majority of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells (0.4-4 [micro]M) [184].
(1967) Hydrogenosome, a cytoplasmic organelle of the anaerobic flagellate Tritrichomonas foetus, and its role in pyruvate metabolism.
Ademas, el fluido abomasal se sembro en medio de cultivo para Tritrichomonas foetus.