trauma injury severity score

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trauma injury severity score

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TRISS

A calculation of the probability that an injured person will survive serious trauma. It is made on the basis of the patient's age. the type of trauma (blunt versus penetrating), and the injury severity score and revised trauma score.
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The will of Elizabeth Triss is an exceptionally informative source in several ways.
Wilhelm Triss became a burgher in 1496 and a member of the Great Guild in 1498 (Burgerbuch, 37; TLA, coll.
Triss has a production and recording company called CA which he began in Budaiya nearly a year ago.
5] Nonstandard abbreviations: ALI, acute lung injury; ARDS, adult respiratory distress syndrome; MODS, multiorgan dysfunction syndrome; sCD62L and sL-selectin, soluble L-selectin; QUADAS, Quality Assessment of Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy included in Systematic Reviews; WMD, weighted mean difference; CI, confidence interval; QUOROM, Quality of Reporting MetaAnalyses; ISS, Injury Severity Score; and TRISS, Trauma and Injury Severity Score.
The literature review that follows incorporates the characterisation of trauma centres, an overview of the nature and severity of injuries and a description of the TRISS method of analysing injury severity.
Age as an important determinant of human physiological reserve and hence patient survival, is discussed with the TRISS method of analysing injury severity.
The TRISS method gives a physiological and anatomical index of injury severity based on the Injury Severity Score (ISS), the Revised Trauma Score (RTS), the patient's age and whether the injury was blunt or penetrating (Woodford, 2001:5).
In combining these four parameters, the TRISS method is useful to quantify the probability of survival (Ps) and to evaluate the outcomes of trauma care.
assess the severity of injuries, according to the TRISS method, on admission to the trauma casualty; and
To determine the injury severity index, a sample of 10% (n=163) was randomly selected for analysis using the TRISS method.
In order to apply the TRISS method of analysing injury severity (Table 2), the sample was categorised into blunt trauma (n=52) and penetrating trauma (n=111).
Researchers and trauma practitioners generally agree that the TRISS method is one of the major advances in measuring injury severity and trauma outcomes.