triple X syndrome

(redirected from Trisomy X)

tri·ple X syn·drome

trisomy of the X chromosome; original observations (made in mental institutions) were seriously biased and the phenotypic changes spurious. Intelligence may be at the lower range of normal, stature is usually tall, there may be speech and behavioral problems. The outstanding feature of the syndrome is the occurrence of twin Barr bodies in a typical cell.

tri·ple X syn·drome

trisomy of the X chromosome; original observations (made in mental institutions) were seriously biased and the phenotypic changes spurious. Intelligence may be at the lower range of normal, stature is usually tall, there may be speech and behavioral problems. The outstanding feature of the syndrome is the occurrence of twin Barr bodies in a typical cell.
A condition that may affect any woman with 2 or more X chromosomes. The symptoms tend to be more pronounced with more X chromosomes

triple X syndrome

XXX syndrome, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
This may be particularly true in cases of double trisomy X and 18, in which fetal features are dominated by those related to trisomy 18 [3] and those of trisomy X may be overlooked.
Typically, trisomy X is a maternal meiosis I error (63% of the time) and trisomy 18 is a maternal meiosis II error 59% of the time [11].
As isolated trisomyXshows no distinct malformations at birth except for minor abnormalities such as epicanthal fold and clinodactyly, trisomy X may be totally asymptomatic at birth and likely diagnosed later in life [9].
Wilson, "A review of trisomy X (47,XXX)," Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, vol.
Caption: Figure 3: Karyotype of placental tissue reveals coexistent trisomy 18 and trisomy X (a).
Trisomy X: focal chorangiosis, with no features of aneuploidy [(b) magnification x100, H&E].
Although Jeanne thought that her baby-to-be was being tested for Down syndrome or other significant disabilities, her obstetrician phoned her to let her know that the fetus had a high probability of having Trisomy X, or an extra X chromosome in a female.
Klinefelter Syndrome and Trisomy X are known as sex chromosome aneuploidy, or variations in the typical number of chromosomes.
One female in each 1000 live births has Trisomy X. A male can also have an extra Y chromosome, known as XYY syndrome.
Jeanne and her husband were referred to a genetic counselor who explained that the prenatal blood test results only predicted with a fair amount of certainty that their daughter would have Trisomy X. If they wanted to know definitively before birth, Jeanne would have to undergo amniocentesis, an invasive test using a needle through the uterine wall to draw out a sample of amniotic fluid.
After Jeanne's baby, Arianna, was born, a blood test confirmed the diagnosis of Trisomy X. Arianna's development was normal until she reached 18 months, when the pediatrician recommended an early intervention evaluation for speech and motor delays.
Noninvasive prenatal genetic testing for fetal aneuploidy detects maternal trisomy X. Prenat Diagn 2012;32:1114-6.