Trichophyton tonsurans


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Tri·choph·y·ton ton·'su·rans

an anthropophilic endothrix species of fungi that causes epidemic dermatophytosis in Europe, South America, and the U.S.; it infects some animals and requires thiamin for growth. It is the most common cause of tinea capitis in the U.S., forming black dots where hair breaks off at the skin surface.

Trichophyton tonsurans

The most frequent cause of ringworm of the scalp.
See: tinea capitis
See also: Trichophyton
References in periodicals archive ?
Diger etkenler ise sirayla Trichophyton mentagrophytes (% 15.4), Trichophyton verrucosum (%4.2), Microsporum canis (%4.2), Epidermophyton floccosum (%2.8), Trichophyton violaceum (%2.11) ve Trichophyton tonsurans (%0.7) idi (Tablo 1).
Examples of fungi that cause endothrix infections are Trichophyton tonsurans and T.
Greater than 90% of tinea capitis infections are caused by Trichophyton tonsurans (Schwartz, Bell, Bingham, Chugn, & Cohen, 2003).
Se utilizaron un total de 100 aislados de dermatofitos (74 Trichophyton rubrum, 18 Trichophyton mentagrophytes, 1 Trichophyton tonsurans, 5 Microsporum canis y 2 Epidermophyton floccosum) provenientes de muestras clinicas aisladas e identificadas en la Seccion de Micologia Medica, IMT.
Currently, about 90% of those infected with a form of ringworm known as Trichophyton tonsurans have been identified as blacks.
Trichophyton tonsurans was the most common organism reported in North America, and Wood's light examination/light microscopic examination was the most common hair sample collection method identified.
Out of the two positive tinea capitis cases, one case each of Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Trichophyton tonsurans was obtained.
#5.2 Alternaria alternata 8 Trichophyton tonsurans #86 T.
Tinea corporis due to Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Trichophyton tonsurans mimicking tinea imbricate.
Various epidemiological studies have been published in literature and the predominant species causing tineacapitis in the United States during the first half of the 20th century was the anthropophilic species Microsporum audouinii.7 By the 1970s to 1980s Trichophyton tonsurans, another anthropophilic dermatophyte, had become the most common cause of tinea capitis.7
Malassezia furfur (50%) and trichophyton tonsurans (30%) were the most common fungal organisms.
mentagrophytes, 1 para Trichophyton tonsurans, 3 para Alternaria sp., 1 para Acremonium sp., 1 para Aspergillus sp., 1 para Candida sp, 2 para S.