Trichinella


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Trichinella

 [trik″ĭ-nel´ah]
a genus of parasitic nematodes (roundworms). T. spira´lis is a species found in the striated muscle of various animals, and causes trichinosis in humans who eat poorly cooked pork.

Trichinella

(trik'i-nel'ă),
A nematode genus in the aphasmid group that causes trichinosis in humans and other carnivores.
[Mod. L. fr. trichina + dim. suffix ella]

Trichinella

/Trich·i·nel·la/ (trik″ĭ-nel´ah) a genus of nematode parasites, including T. spira´lis, the etiologic agent of trichinosis, found in the muscles of rats, pigs, and humans.

Trich·i·nel·la

(trik'i-nel'ă)
A nematode genus in the aphasmid group that causes trichinosis in humans and carnivores.
[Mod. L. fr. trichina + dim. suffix -ella]

Trichinella

(trik″ĭ-nel′ă)
A genus of nematode worms belonging to the order Trichurida and the family Trichinellidae. They are parasitic in humans, hogs, rats, and many other mammals.
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TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS: Encysted in muscle tissue (×800)
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TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS

Trichinella spiralis

The species of Trichinella that commonly infests humans, causing trichinosis. Infection occurs when raw or improperly cooked meat, particularly pork and wild game, containing cysts is eaten. Larvae excyst in the duodenum and invade the mucosa of the small intestine, becoming adults in 5 to 7 days. After fertilization, each female deposits 1000 to 2000 larvae, which enter the blood or lymph vessels and circulate to various parts of the body where they encyst, esp. in striated muscle.
See: illustrationillustration

Trichinella

a genus of nematode parasites in the family Trichinellidae.

Trichinella spiralis spiralis (T1), Trichinella pseudospiralis (T4), Trichinella spiralis domestica (Trichinella spiralis), Trichinella britovi (T3), Trichinella nativa (T2) and Trichinella nelsoni (T7)
adult worms of the species listed above, together with their internationally recognized code numbers, are found in the intestines and the encapsulated, first stage larvae in the striated muscle of various animals. Three other species of uncertain taxonomy, T5, T6, T8, are also encountered. T. spiralis is a common cause of infection in humans as a result of ingestion of poorly cooked pork.
References in periodicals archive ?
PrioCHECK Trichinella AAD is a reliable alternative to the currently used pepsin-based artificial digestion method, because the test uses a recombinantly produced enzyme from a standardized and secured production facility, ensuring good availability of the enzyme and consistent quality.
Trichinella has been detected in several wildlife species, (1) including black bear which has also been identified as the source of an outbreak in Saskatchewan in 2000.
Survival of sylvatic Trichinella spiralis isolates in frozen tissue and processed meat products.
Of the three pathogens studied, the positive tests for the trichinella roundworm surprised researchers the most.
Trichinellosis, a disease caused by Trichinella spiralis which occurs in humans and animals, was the subject of this trial.
Two organisms chosen for sequencing are threats to human health: a Trichinella roundworm that spreads to people from undercooked pork and the Biomphalaria freshwater snail, which hosts a parasitic fluke that causes schistosomiasis.
Extensions of the work have included the characterization of monoclonal antibodies that exhibir protection in animal models of infection for the parasite Trichinella spiralis and the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.
spiralis, most commonly associated with domestic pork, four other species of Trichinella are now recognized, including T.
Trichinosis is caused by Trichinella spiralis, a parasite that is transmitted to humans and other animals by eating undercooked meat.
For example, a firm may sell raw pork contaminated with Trichinella and then a consumer may undercook the pork at home, failing to kill the parasite.
Nor did they address the need to include other pathogens in the meat inspection system, such as Trichinella spiralis and Toxoplasma gondii, the latter of which occurs with some frequency and can cause serious disease in fetuses and immunocompromised hosts.