tribe

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tribe

 [trīb]
a taxonomic category subordinate to a family (or subfamily) and superior to a genus (or subtribe).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tribe

(trīb),
In biologic classification, an occasionally used division between the family and the genus; often the same as the subfamily.
[L. tribus]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tribe

(trīb)
n.
1. A unit of sociopolitical organization consisting of a number of families, clans, or other groups who share a common ancestry and culture and among whom leadership is typically neither formalized nor permanent.
2. Biology A taxonomic category ranking below a family or subfamily and above a genus and usually containing several genera.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tribe

(trīb)
In biologic classification, an occasionally used division between the family and the genus; often the same as the subfamily.
[L. tribus]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tribe

a taxonomic category between genus and subfamily, used mainly in the CLASSIFICATION of plants.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
His emotional attachment to tribal societies is evident.
Diamond argues further that tribal societies are considerably more violent than industrialized societies and that 'most small-scale societies [are] trapped in...
'Honour is codified in the whole psyche of tribal societies and contains in it an entire system of belief.
Collaborative Complementarity in Tribal Societies and Spiritualities
Even as a religious ritual, circumcision was practised by only a few tribal societies, mostly living in desert regions: the Semtitic and Hamitic peoples of north and east Africa and the Middle East, and the Aboriginal people of central Australia are the most notable.
An unelaborated endnote identifies Arnold van Gennep and Victor Turner as the source of the term and definition of liminal that Greene borrows to examine the "emplotments" and the social state of "bright mulatto and white mulatto women as centered subjects" in novels published "from the 1850s through World War I." But he distorts the term and misapplies it by quoting van Gennep and Turner out of context and by neglecting to explain that they are anthropologists who developed the language primarily to describe the second spatial and transitional stage of triadic rites of passage in tribal societies.
The twelve-chapter compilation addresses early Indian-White relations, the influence of trade goods and diseases on Native cultures, intertribal relations, and women's roles within tribal societies. Ewers also examines the significance of material culture analysis of tribal and American drawings, maps, and artifacts.
He elaborates more by stating, "I know that sex is natural, but I pursue it with a psychology that carries with it old wounds of tribal societies that migrated to the cities.
Clearly the experiences of non-Western, formerly colonialized nations are not directly or totally transferable to the situation of American Indian tribal societies. Nonetheless, the legitimacy issues brought on by the destruction of traditional governing structures and authorities and the imposition of political institutions grounded in alien political paradigms are problems common to developing nations in the non-Western world and American Indian nations as well.
We see it in some tribal societies, such as the Tiruray and the BaMbuti.
The modern 'unhinging of the pendulum' occurs with the centralization of the state, its affirmation of a monopoly on violence, and the subsequent decline of independent tribal societies. The supremacy of the urban style of life in modern Islamic society favors the urban style of faith, with its legalistic puritan simplicity, at the expense of the saints, magic and colorful ritual of the tribal hinterlands.
The new arrangement caused further economic decline, drove many peasants off their land, and tore the social fabric of tribal societies. Even after the Sepoy Rebellion (1857-58), the Raj extracted so much revenue from the Central provinces and invested so little in return that it continued to impoverish the region and undermine its own tax base.

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