amine

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amine

 [am´in, ah´mēn]
an organic compound containing nitrogen.
biogenic amine bioamine.
sympathomimetic a's amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, the group includes the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.
vasoactive a's amines that cause vasodilation and increase small vessel permeability, such as histamine and serotonin.

a·mine

, primary aminesecondary aminetertiary aminequaternary ammonium ion (ă-mēn', am'in), Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine; that of two atoms, a secondary amine; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

(ah-mēn´) (am´in) an organic compound containing nitrogen; any of a group of compounds formed from ammonia by replacement of one or more hydrogen atoms by organic radicals.
biogenic amine  a type of amine synthesized by plants and animals and frequently involved in signaling, e.g., neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin; others are hormones or components of vitamins, phospholipids, bacteria, or ribosomes, e.g., cadaverine, choline, histamine, and spermine.
sympathomimetic amines  amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, comprising the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.

amine

[am′in, əmēn′]
Etymology: L, ammonia
(in chemistry) an organic derivative of ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by alkyl or aryl groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn')
A substance derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine, e.g., NH2CH3; that of two atoms, a secondary amine, e.g., NH(CH3)2; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine, e.g., N(CH3)3; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, e.g., +N(CH3)4, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

A class of organic compounds derived from ammonia by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms by a member of the paraffin series or by an aromatic group. Amines occur widely in the body, and many drugs are amines.

amine

an organic base formed by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms of ammonia by organic groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn') Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable as shown here.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals.

amine

an organic compound containing nitrogen.

biogenic a's
amine neurotransmitters, e.g. norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine.
direct-acting sympathomimetic a's
activate adrenergic effector cells, e.g. catecholamine, directly and do not need adrenergic nerves to exert their effects.
amine hormones
enteroendocrine cells, distributed widely in the gastric, intestinal and pancreatic tissue, synthesize peptide and amine hormones that control the secretion of digestive juices. See also apud cells.
amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation cells
toxic a's
occur in plants, e.g. cyclopamine, tyramine.
vasoactive amine
amine that causes vasodilatation and increases small vessel permeability, e.g. histamine and serotonin.
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The cross-linking density of the hybrid resin was enhanced by adding diethylene triamine into the emulsion and reacted with block isocyanate and epoxide group at 80[degrees]C in the interior of the emulsion particles.
Those purchased include: diethylene triamine (DETA), 4,4'-methylene dianiline (MDA), and bis(para-aminocyclohexyl) methane (PACM)--an aliphatic, aromatic, and cycloaliphatic amine, respectively.
Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), 5,5'-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and dimethyl sulfoxide were from Dojindo Laboratories (Kumamoto, Japan).
8, 150 mmol/L NaCl, 20 [micro]mol/L diethylene triamine penta acetic acid, 1 g/L Germall, 0.
pentamethyl-diethylene triamine (PMDETA), both supplied by Air Products;
Chemical structures of the diamines Abbreviations and properties g/mol DETA Diethylene triamine (99%) 103.
Estimation of glomerular filtration rate using chromium-51 ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid and technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid.
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The various reactive epoxy systems were based on the same diglycidylether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) and on a polyether triamine (Jeffamine T403- from Texaco Chem.