Trendelenburg position

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Related to Trendelenburg positions: reverse Trendelenburg, lithotomy positions

Tren·de·len·burg po·si·tion

(tren'dĕ-lĕn-bĕrg),
a supine position in which the feet are higher than the head; used in patients who become acutely hypotensive.

Trendelenburg position

Etymology: Friedrich Trendelenburg
a position in which the head is low and the body and legs are on an inclined plane. It is sometimes used in pelvic surgery to displace the abdominal organs upward, out of the pelvis, or to increase the blood flow to the brain in hypotension and shock.
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Trendelenburg position

Trendelenburg position

Trendelenburg Orthopedics A position in which the Pt is on an elevated and inclined plane, usually about 45º. with the pelvis higher than the head, and the feet over the edge of the table; the TP is used in abdominal surgery to scoot the abdominal organs toward the chest, and to help manage non head-trauma-related shock. See Gait, Position.

Tren·de·len·burg po·si·tion

(tren-del'en-burg pŏ-zishŭn)
A supine position on the operating table, which is inclined at varying angles so that the pelvis is higher than the head; used during and after operations in the pelvis or for shock.

Trendelenburg,

Friedrich, German surgeon, 1844-1924.
Brodie-Trendelenburg test - see under Brodie, Sir Benjamin C
reverse Trendelenburg position - supine position, without flexing or extending, in which the head is higher than the feet.
steep Trendelenburg position
Trendelenburg cannula
Trendelenburg gait
Trendelenburg limp
Trendelenburg lurch
Trendelenburg operation - pulmonary embolectomy.
Trendelenburg position - a supine position on the operating table, used during and after operations in the pelvis or for shock.
Trendelenburg sign - in congenital dislocation of the hip or in hip abductor weakness, the pelvis will sag on the side opposite to the dislocation when the hip and knee of the normal side is flexed.
Trendelenburg symptom - a waddling gait in paresis of the gluteal muscles, as in progressive muscular dystrophy. Synonym(s): Trendelenburg waddle
Trendelenburg tampon
Trendelenburg test - a test of the valves of the leg veins.
Trendelenburg vein ligation
Trendelenburg waddle - Synonym(s): Trendelenburg symptom

Tren·de·len·burg po·si·tion

(tren-delĕn-bŭrg pŏ-zishŭn)
A supine position on the operating table, which is inclined at varying angles so that the pelvis is higher than the head; used during and after operations in the pelvis or to treat shock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results: The change in the CSA of the IJV from the supine to the Trendelenburg position (1.
The use of the Trendelenburg position for IJV cannulation in obese patients can no longer be supported.
While the probe was held in the same position, the right IJV was imaged after two different conditions in a sealed envelope were applied in random order: State 0, table flat (no tilt), with the patients in the supine position, and State T, in which the operating table was tilted 20 to the Trendelenburg position.
The CSA, the transverse and anteroposterior diameters of the right IJV between the supine and the Trendelenburg position, were not significantly different.
Other complications reported in the literature are related to placing the patient in a steep Trendelenburg position during the surgical procedure.
Patients with significant co-morbidities are at increased risk for postoperative complications related to physiological changes that occur from being placed in a steep Trendelenburg position.
Based on literature review and this study's findings, education modules included information about complications associated with prolonged time in a steep Trendelenburg position, preoperative and intraoperative fluid volume management, postoperative positioning, and close monitoring of oxygen saturation in the postoperative period.
During this extended time, surgeons performing the procedure improved their technique and reduced operative times, in turn decreasing patient time in steep Trendelenburg position and possibly affecting patient outcomes and thus study findings.
The Trendelenburg position is the elevation of the pelvis above the horizontal plane, in a supine position, and was introduced in the latter part of the 17th century as a method of facilitating surgical exposure of the pelvic organs, by Fredreich Trendelenburg.
A further assessment identified the client was experiencing some breathing difficulties, at which time the head of her bed was returned to the level position, and her legs remained elevated, the modified Trendelenburg position.
The organisation's protocols and guidelines supported the use of the Trendelenburg position at this hospital.
Unexpectedly, 6 subjects (20%) in the Trendelenburg position experienced a decrease in ICP, though not to a therapeutic level.