Trendelenburg position

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Related to Trendelenburg positions: reverse Trendelenburg, lithotomy positions

Tren·de·len·burg po·si·tion

(tren'dĕ-lĕn-bĕrg),
a supine position in which the feet are higher than the head; used in patients who become acutely hypotensive.

Trendelenburg position

Etymology: Friedrich Trendelenburg
a position in which the head is low and the body and legs are on an inclined plane. It is sometimes used in pelvic surgery to displace the abdominal organs upward, out of the pelvis, or to increase the blood flow to the brain in hypotension and shock.
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Trendelenburg position

Trendelenburg position

Trendelenburg Orthopedics A position in which the Pt is on an elevated and inclined plane, usually about 45º. with the pelvis higher than the head, and the feet over the edge of the table; the TP is used in abdominal surgery to scoot the abdominal organs toward the chest, and to help manage non head-trauma-related shock. See Gait, Position.

Tren·de·len·burg po·si·tion

(tren-del'en-burg pŏ-zishŭn)
A supine position on the operating table, which is inclined at varying angles so that the pelvis is higher than the head; used during and after operations in the pelvis or for shock.

Trendelenburg,

Friedrich, German surgeon, 1844-1924.
Brodie-Trendelenburg test - see under Brodie, Sir Benjamin C
reverse Trendelenburg position - supine position, without flexing or extending, in which the head is higher than the feet.
steep Trendelenburg position
Trendelenburg cannula
Trendelenburg gait
Trendelenburg limp
Trendelenburg lurch
Trendelenburg operation - pulmonary embolectomy.
Trendelenburg position - a supine position on the operating table, used during and after operations in the pelvis or for shock.
Trendelenburg sign - in congenital dislocation of the hip or in hip abductor weakness, the pelvis will sag on the side opposite to the dislocation when the hip and knee of the normal side is flexed.
Trendelenburg symptom - a waddling gait in paresis of the gluteal muscles, as in progressive muscular dystrophy. Synonym(s): Trendelenburg waddle
Trendelenburg tampon
Trendelenburg test - a test of the valves of the leg veins.
Trendelenburg vein ligation
Trendelenburg waddle - Synonym(s): Trendelenburg symptom

Tren·de·len·burg po·si·tion

(tren-delĕn-bŭrg pŏ-zishŭn)
A supine position on the operating table, which is inclined at varying angles so that the pelvis is higher than the head; used during and after operations in the pelvis or to treat shock.
References in periodicals archive ?
The organisation's protocols and guidelines supported the use of the Trendelenburg position at this hospital.
The assumption was, that by placing the patient in the Trendelenburg position, this was also beneficial to her recovery.
7) This indicates the Trendelenburg position does not promote venous return to the heart.
A survey sent out to 1000 critical care nurses identified 90 percent of respondents used the Trendelenburg position, mostly for the treatment of hypotension, and used this intervention as an independent nursing action, having learned about the position from nursing education, colleagues, supervisors and physicians.
10) An open-ended survey question to nurses asking them to share their understanding of the Trendelenburg position identified four themes.
Just as the patient objected to a head down, tilt position, research has shown that conscious patients usually do object to the Trendelenburg position after a very short time.
In a preliminary study to determine the effects of the Trendelenburg position on cardiac output and oxygenation in 23 critically ill patients, five patients were unable to tolerate the position at all.
Despite its widespread use, the Trendelenburg position has not been shown to provide any consistent beneficial erects for patients.
The process that followed the initial question regarding the efficacy of the Trendelenburg position stimulated discussion, prompted a review of the organisation's protocols and procedures, individual nursing actions and philosophies of care, and initiated a search for relevant and current literature to support that action.
Research, in this case, identified the Trendelenburg position to be outdated and the current suggestion is that the contoured supine position deserves further investigation.