Trendelenburg position


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Tren·de·len·burg po·si·tion

(tren'dĕ-lĕn-bĕrg),
a supine position in which the feet are higher than the head; used in patients who become acutely hypotensive.

Trendelenburg position

Etymology: Friedrich Trendelenburg
a position in which the head is low and the body and legs are on an inclined plane. It is sometimes used in pelvic surgery to displace the abdominal organs upward, out of the pelvis, or to increase the blood flow to the brain in hypotension and shock.
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Trendelenburg position

Trendelenburg position

Trendelenburg Orthopedics A position in which the Pt is on an elevated and inclined plane, usually about 45º. with the pelvis higher than the head, and the feet over the edge of the table; the TP is used in abdominal surgery to scoot the abdominal organs toward the chest, and to help manage non head-trauma-related shock. See Gait, Position.

Tren·de·len·burg po·si·tion

(tren-del'en-burg pŏ-zishŭn)
A supine position on the operating table, which is inclined at varying angles so that the pelvis is higher than the head; used during and after operations in the pelvis or for shock.

Trendelenburg,

Friedrich, German surgeon, 1844-1924.
Brodie-Trendelenburg test - see under Brodie, Sir Benjamin C
reverse Trendelenburg position - supine position, without flexing or extending, in which the head is higher than the feet.
steep Trendelenburg position
Trendelenburg cannula
Trendelenburg gait
Trendelenburg limp
Trendelenburg lurch
Trendelenburg operation - pulmonary embolectomy.
Trendelenburg position - a supine position on the operating table, used during and after operations in the pelvis or for shock.
Trendelenburg sign - in congenital dislocation of the hip or in hip abductor weakness, the pelvis will sag on the side opposite to the dislocation when the hip and knee of the normal side is flexed.
Trendelenburg symptom - a waddling gait in paresis of the gluteal muscles, as in progressive muscular dystrophy. Synonym(s): Trendelenburg waddle
Trendelenburg tampon
Trendelenburg test - a test of the valves of the leg veins.
Trendelenburg vein ligation
Trendelenburg waddle - Synonym(s): Trendelenburg symptom

Tren·de·len·burg po·si·tion

(tren-delĕn-bŭrg pŏ-zishŭn)
A supine position on the operating table, which is inclined at varying angles so that the pelvis is higher than the head; used during and after operations in the pelvis or to treat shock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on literature review and this study's findings, education modules included information about complications associated with prolonged time in a steep Trendelenburg position, preoperative and intraoperative fluid volume management, postoperative positioning, and close monitoring of oxygen saturation in the postoperative period.
P]), three minutes after the steep Trendelenburg position (35[degrees] which was measured with protractor) was added to pneumoperitoneum during which time insufflation pressure was set to 15 mmHg ([T.
The Trendelenburg position is the elevation of the pelvis above the horizontal plane, in a supine position, and was introduced in the latter part of the 17th century as a method of facilitating surgical exposure of the pelvic organs, by Fredreich Trendelenburg.
Jewett testified conversely, that when she observed Dingler, the patient was tilted in the Trendelenburg position.
Unexpectedly, 6 subjects (20%) in the Trendelenburg position experienced a decrease in ICP, though not to a therapeutic level.
The position of the patient throughout the study was supine with 10-15 degrees Trendelenburg position.
I usually place the patient into a moderate Trendelenburg position before docking the robot and observe the patient's cardiac and respiratory responses to the induction of anesthesia.
Joseph site at Mons- Stand with single-level loop, ground,- Detector 30 x 30- 2 control room screens- In mandatory options: tilting table in Trendelenburg position and great in the exam room screen monitor.
2,3) Also, pelvic anatomy visualized two-dimensionally under magnification during traditional laparoscopy can look very different than it does during conventional surgery, due to the effects of the pneumoperitoneum, steep Trendelenburg position, and/or the use of uterine manipulators.
More cranial extension of the analgesia simultaneously from tail to the umbilical area recognized in animals of this study might have resulted from gravity during induction and due to dorsal recumbency and Trendelenburg position during laparoscopy.
Tom could not tolerate the Trendelenburg position because of his phrenic nerve damage, so the only option was to pause the treatment and resume at a slower speed when his symptoms resolved.