dendrochronology

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dendrochronology

the study of ANNUAL RINGS in timber to calculate the age of the tree (often very precisely) and the climatic situation at the time of growth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, the research team found an ash from a known volcanic eruption at the depth where the carbon-14 content was equal to that of tree rings ~10,200 years.
To address this, we used dendroecological (i.e., the study of tree rings) and stable isotope ratios ([[delta].sup.13] and [[delta].sup.18]O) to examine the growth, performance, and water use efficiency of the trees, and assess the species acclimation strategies across density and precipitation regimes in NE.
Researchers looked at previous measurements of latewood tree rings taken from the British Isles and the northeast Mediterranean region, with the rings covering the years 1728-1975 (latewood is the portion of an annual tree ring that forms in the latter part of the growing season).
Tree ring width and density evidence of climatic and potential forest change in Alaska.
The tree rings in these samples are considered floating in time since years, not dates, were assigned to the individual tree rings.
According to NASA, scientists reconstructed the Mediterranean's drought history by studying tree rings as part of an effort to understand the region's climate and what shifts water to or from the area.
According to NASA, the scientists there reconstructed the Mediterranean's drought history by studying tree rings as part of an effort to understand the region's climate and what shifts water to or from the area.
The potential of tree rings in revealing the decline history has been frequently illustrated for oak and other tree species (Young, 1965; Tainter et al., 1984, 1990; Hartmann et al., 1989; Cook & Zedaker, 1992; Hartmann & Blank, 1992; Pedersen, 1998; Bigler et al., 2006).
Tree Rings "It has long been known that there is a correlation between the sunspot cycle and the growth of trees, as measured by the thickness of their annual rings.
In the past, scientists have used two key pieces of evidence when measuring the relationship between volcanic activity and climate change: ice cores and tree rings.
(4) What other things do you think tree rings might help scientists investigate?