traumatology

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traumatology

 [traw″mah-tol´ah-je]
the branch of surgery dealing with wounds and disability from injuries.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

trau·ma·tol·o·gy

(traw'mă-tol'ŏ-jē),
The branch of surgery concerned with the injured.
[traumato- + G. logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

traumatology

(trô′mə-tŏl′ə-jē, trou′-)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the surgical treatment of injuries.

trau′ma·to·log′i·cal adj.
trau′ma·tol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

trau·ma·tol·o·gy

(traw'mă-tol'ŏ-jē)
The branch of surgery concerned with the injured.
[traumato- + G. logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

traumatology

The study and practice of the management of patients suffering from recent physical injury, as from traffic or other accidents or assault.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Consistent with crisis-management protocol (the Incident Command System), GCP members filled the roles of Incident Commander (initially Kathleen Figley), Operations Manager, Public Relations Specialist (Charles Figley), and team leaders who each supervised five traumatologists.
Unlike other organizations, however, the GCP in its operations manual requires that all teams include a compassion-fatigue specialist responsible for daily team defusing, the general morale of the team, and follow-up after the traumatologists return home.
This collection of 16 articles addresses basic questions rehabilitation traumatologists have about the epidemiology of trauma-related disability, trauma care systems in the US, early rehabilitation interventions, multiple musculoskeletal trauma, rehabilitation after brain injury and traumatic leg amputation, diagnosis and rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injuries, burns, chronic pain management, management of substance abuse after trauma, adjustment to trauma, quality care indicators for trauma rehabilitation, pediatric patients with disability due to trauma, and prevention of disability secondary to trauma.
All patients with acute tibial plateau fractures were evaluated by one of two orthopaedic traumatologists at our academic medical center.
Specialty structure analysis indicated 84.9% (P<0.05) cases in the following areas: obstetrics and gynecologists (25.2%), surgeons (15.2%), traumatologists (8.4%), pediatricians (7.7%), doctors in the emergency care units (6.74%), infectionists (3.3%), nurses (3.1%), hematologists (2.3%), ambulance aid doctors (2.14%).
Within the group of diagnostic defects, non-recognition of basic disease (trauma) was mostly observed in practice of therapeutists (12.4%), surgeons (12.0%), hematologists (9.6%), traumatologists (6.7%), pediatricians (6.2%), obstetricians and gynecologists (5.7%), neurosurgeons, neurologists and doctors in the intensive care units (5.3%), ambulance doctors (4.8%) and infectiouists (3.8%) (P<0.05).
In contrast, pelvic and acetabular fractures are high energy injuries and are often managed by fellowship-trained traumatologists.
(14-21) However, these reports differ from our research, as they examined elective surgery (arthroplasty) or low energy trauma commonly treated by generalists in orthopaedics (hip fractures), while our focus was high energy trauma typically managed by fellowship-trained traumatologists. It is hypothesized that complex trauma cases may be more likely to be initially managed at the presenting institution and then transferred to specialized centers for more definitive care if the case complexity or patient comorbidities warrants transfer.
Patients were treated by one of three fellowship-trained traumatologists. Eight patients were either lost to follow-up or did not wish to return for functional evaluation and were excluded from the analysis.