velocity

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ve·loc·i·ty (v),

(vĕ-los'i-tē),
Rate of movement; specifically, distance traveled or quantity converted per unit time in a given direction. Compare: speed.
[L. velocitas, fr. velox (veloc-), quick, swift]

velocity

[vəlos′itē]
Etymology: L, velox, quick
the rate of change in the position of a body moving in a particular direction. Velocity along a straight line is linear velocity. Angular velocity is that of a body in circular motion. Compare speed.

velocity

An MRI term for the speed of a thing in a particular direction.

velocity

The rate of a body's motion in a given direction per unit of time; speed Ballistics The speed that a projectile/bullet attains while in flight; the difference in tissue destruction between high- or low-velocity bullets is caused by the fragmentation of the bullet–as occurs in an M-16 semiautomatic weapon, rather than the speed of the bullet. See Ballistics, Critical velocity.

ve·loc·i·ty

(v) (vĕ-los'i-tē)
Rate and direction of movement; specifically, distance traveled or quantity converted per unit time in a given direction.
[L. velocitas, fr. velox (veloc-), quick, swift]

velocity

rate of change of position with respect to time. A vector quantity so has both magnitude (speed) and direction; linear velocity the linear displacement per unit time; angular velocity the angular displacement per unit time, i.e. speed of rotation in a particular direction (e.g. clockwise or anticlockwise); instantaneous velocity velocity of a body or object measured over a very short (infinitesimal) period of time: effectively a continuous measurement of velocity; tangential velocity the velocity of an object or body acting at a tangent to its direction of motion (often when it is moving in a circle or around a curve). See also displacement.

velocity,

n rate of movement (speed) in a specific direction.

ve·loc·i·ty

(vĕ-los'i-tē)
Rate and direction of movement.
[L. velocitas, fr. velox (veloc-), quick, swift]
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the orientation at the outer layers of the LCP film as it exits the die should be the vector sum of the transverse velocity and the longitudinal velocity of the melt, as indicated by the detail in Figure 4.
The transverse velocity component is zero and the temperature gradient in the transverse direction is also zero.
The transverse velocity field and gradient induced by the mixing flight helix angle (ii) is
They simplified the problem by neglecting the transverse velocity component, the velocity gradient in the flow direction, and thermal conduction in the planar directions.
If the transverse velocity is neglected, a particle starting its flow path in the lower portion of the channel will never exit the extruder.