suprascapular artery

(redirected from Transverse scapular)

su·pra·scap·u·lar ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, thyrocervical trunk; distribution, clavicle, scapula, muscles of shoulder, and shoulder joint; anastomoses, transverse cervical circumflex scapular.

su·pra·scap·u·lar ar·te·ry

(sū'pră-skap'yū-lăr ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, thyrocervical trunk; distribution, clavicle, scapula, muscles of shoulder, and shoulder joint; anastomoses, transverse cervical circumflex scapular.
Synonym(s): arteria suprascapularis [TA] , transverse scapular artery.

suprascapular artery

A branch of the thyrocervical trunk (from the subclavian artery); it runs over the superior transverse scapular ligament in the scapular notch and supplies blood to the supraspinous and infraspinous fossae. Its branches include the acromial arteries and it anastomoses with the subscapular and transverse cervical arteries.
See also: artery
References in periodicals archive ?
Originating from the upper trunk of the brachial plexus, the suprascapular nerve passes through the suprascapular notch, beneath the transverse scapular ligament and sends motor branches to the supraspinatus muscle.
6) They reported that abduction or horizontal adduction of the shoulder exerted traction on the suprascapular nerve, which led to its compression against the superior transverse scapular ligament.
Rengachary and colleagues (7,8) conducted an extensive anatomical, clinical and comparative study of the possible etiology of suprascapular nerve entrapment, suggesting that a "sling effect" causes traumatic kinking of the suprascapular nerve against the superior transverse scapular ligament.
7,8) This classification system is based on the shape of the inferior border of the notch as well as the degree of ossification of the superior transverse scapular ligament, dividing the suprascapular notches into six different types (Fig.
Then the notches were classified using the system used by Ticker and associates, (2) which examines the inferior border of the suprascapular notch separately from the superior transverse scapular ligament.
According to Landis and Koch, (11) this reliability and reproducibility is of "moderate" strength for the inferior border of the notch and of "substantial" strength for the superior transverse scapular ligament.
There did not seem to be any relation between age and the degree of ossification of the superior transverse scapular ligament, when the scapular types were compared as two groups less than or equal to 50 years old and greater than 50 years old (p = 0.
12) In contrast, variations in the morphology of the superior transverse scapular ligament have been identified and associated with suprascapular nerve entrapment in several case reports.
The classification system used by Ticker and associates separates the superior transverse scapular ligament from the inferior border of the notch, resulting in less transitional and ambiguous notches.
In specimen preparation the amount of osteophytes in the superior transverse scapular ligament may have been changed.
The kappa value for the superior transverse scapular ligament in the classification system used by Ticker and associates is considered "substantial," which is the only part of the suprascapular notch to have been directly linked to suprascapular nerve entrapment in the literature and therefore the most important factor to assess correctly.
Alon M, Weiss S, Fishel B, Dekel S: Bilateral suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome due to an anomalous transverse scapular ligament.

Full browser ?