repressor

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repressor

 [re-pres´or]
that which restrains or inhibits; a specific protein molecule coded for by a regulatory gene, which acts through the cytoplasm to repress the synthesis of a specific protein.

re·pres·sor

(rē-pres'ŏr),
The product of a regulator or repressor gene; a molecular entity that prevents the transcription of regulator genes under control of an operator.

repressor

/re·pres·sor/ (-pres´er) in genetics, a substance produced by a regulator gene that acts to prevent initiation by the operator gene of protein synthesis by the operon.

repressor

(rĭ-prĕs′ər)
n.
1. also represser One that represses.
2. Genetics A protein that binds to an operator, blocking transcription of an operon and the enzymes for which the operon codes.

repressor

[ripres′ər]
Etymology: L, reprimere, to press back
a protein produced by a regulator gene in a bacterial genome. It binds to a sequence of nucleotides in an operator gene, blocking the transcription of one or more structural genes.

re·pres·sor

(rē-pres'ŏr)
The product of a regulator or repressor gene.

repressor

a substance, often proteinaceous, that prevents the function of a gene. see OPERON MODEL.

re·pres·sor

(rē-pres'ŏr)
The product of a regulator or repressor gene.

repressor

that which restrains or inhibits; a specific protein molecule coded for by a regulatory gene, which acts to repress the synthesis of a specific protein.

lac repressor
interacts specifically with the lac operator.
References in periodicals archive ?
An example of glucocorticoid transrepression is the effect on bone metabolism.
This mechanism of inhibitory action by the AhRR is thought to be independent of competition for ARNT and may involve transrepression mechanism as hypothesized previously (Evans et al.
ER[alpha]-AHRARNT protein-protein interactions mediate estradiol-dependent transrepression of dioxininducible gene transcription.