repressor

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repressor

 [re-pres´or]
that which restrains or inhibits; a specific protein molecule coded for by a regulatory gene, which acts through the cytoplasm to repress the synthesis of a specific protein.

re·pres·sor

(rē-pres'ŏr),
The product of a regulator or repressor gene; a molecular entity that prevents the transcription of regulator genes under control of an operator.

repressor

/re·pres·sor/ (-pres´er) in genetics, a substance produced by a regulator gene that acts to prevent initiation by the operator gene of protein synthesis by the operon.

repressor

(rĭ-prĕs′ər)
n.
1. also represser One that represses.
2. Genetics A protein that binds to an operator, blocking transcription of an operon and the enzymes for which the operon codes.

repressor

[ripres′ər]
Etymology: L, reprimere, to press back
a protein produced by a regulator gene in a bacterial genome. It binds to a sequence of nucleotides in an operator gene, blocking the transcription of one or more structural genes.

re·pres·sor

(rē-pres'ŏr)
The product of a regulator or repressor gene.

repressor

a substance, often proteinaceous, that prevents the function of a gene. see OPERON MODEL.

re·pres·sor

(rē-pres'ŏr)
The product of a regulator or repressor gene.

repressor

that which restrains or inhibits; a specific protein molecule coded for by a regulatory gene, which acts to repress the synthesis of a specific protein.

lac repressor
interacts specifically with the lac operator.
References in periodicals archive ?
The anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of glucocorticoids are known to primarily function via a process of negative regulation of gene expression, or transrepression, Frank Buttgereit, M.
An example of glucocorticoid transrepression is the effect on bone metabolism.
Certain enzymes involved in the development of diabetes, for example, are activated at the genomic level by glucocorticoids, and an ongoing research effort is intended to create designer glucocorticoids that preferentially induce transrepression and have little or no transactivating activity--obtaining the benefit without the adverse effects.