repressor

(redirected from Transrepression)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

repressor

 [re-pres´or]
that which restrains or inhibits; a specific protein molecule coded for by a regulatory gene, which acts through the cytoplasm to repress the synthesis of a specific protein.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·pres·sor

(rē-pres'ŏr),
The product of a regulator or repressor gene; a molecular entity that prevents the transcription of regulator genes under control of an operator.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

repressor

(rĭ-prĕs′ər)
n.
1. also represser One that represses.
2. Genetics A protein that binds to an operator, blocking transcription of an operon and the enzymes for which the operon codes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

re·pres·sor

(rē-pres'ŏr)
The product of a regulator or repressor gene.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

repressor

a substance, often proteinaceous, that prevents the function of a gene. see OPERON MODEL.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

re·pres·sor

(rē-pres'ŏr)
The product of a regulator or repressor gene.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
An example of glucocorticoid transrepression is the effect on bone metabolism.
Moreover, PPARs have been proposed to physically cross-inhibit inflammatory transcription factors, such as NF-[kappa]B, AP-1, signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs), and NFAT, in a process termed "transrepression" [103].
GR[beta] acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of GR[alpha]-mediated transactivation and transrepression in certain cell types.
This mechanism of inhibitory action by the AhRR is thought to be independent of competition for ARNT and may involve transrepression mechanism as hypothesized previously (Evans et al.
Glass, "An ADIOL-ER/5-CtBP transrepression pathway negatively regulates microglia-mediated inflammation," Cell, vol.
In addition to its effects on lipid metabolism, PPAR[gamma] dampens inflammation via transrepression of proinflammatory molecules [21].
Therefore, the transrepression activity of PPAR[alpha] on lipid biosynthesis and anaplerosis is just as relevant as its transactivation activity on FAO genes.
Alternatively, p53 can mediate transrepression by preventing the binding of other transcriptional activators to their target sites [37].
ER[alpha]-AHRARNT protein-protein interactions mediate estradiol-dependent transrepression of dioxininducible gene transcription.
Interestingly PPAR-[gamma] was the first reported to undergo agonist-dependent simulation, which promotes binding to nuclear receptor co-repressor-1 protein (NCoR) and stabilizes association with promoter-bound NF-[kappa]B, thereby leading to the transrepression of inflammatory genes in macrophages [86-88].
The negative regulation of inflammatory responses is mediated by the inhibition of transcription factors, for example, NF-[kappa]B, activator protein-1 (AP-1), members of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) protein family, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), often via a mechanism termed transrepression [17, 57].
Transrepression of proinflammatory cytokines by PPAR-[gamma] via inhibition of NF-[kappa]B is a mechanism that has been closely linked to the PPAR-[gamma]-mediated improvement of organ injury, including the heart, by eliminating systemic inflammation in sepsis [14, 15].