transposon

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transposon

 [tranz-po´zon]
a discrete DNA sequence that transposes blocks of genetic material back and forth within a bacterial cell from the chromosome to plasmids or bacteriophage particles, by which the material may be transferred to another cell. Transposons frequently carry genes for resistance to antibiotics.

trans·po·son

(tranz-pō'son),
A segment of DNA (for example, an R-factor gene) that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage; the mechanism of transposition seems to be independent of the host's usual recombination mechanism. See: jumping gene, transposable element.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

/trans·po·son/ (trans-po´zon) a small mobile genetic (DNA) element that moves around the genome or to other genomes within the same cell, usually by copying itself to a second site but sometimes by splicing itself out of its original site and inserting in a new location. Eukaryotic transposons are sometimes called transposable elements.

transposon

(trăns-pō′zŏn)
n.
A segment of DNA that is capable of moving into a new position within the same or another chromosome or plasmid. Also called jumping gene.

transposon

[transpō′sən]
Etymology: L, transponere + on
a segment of DNA that can move from one place to another in a cell's genome or between a bacterial cell and a plasmid or virus. Viruses may even carry a transposon from one bacterium to another. Also called jumping gene, transposable element.

trans·po·son

(trans-pō'zon)
A segment of DNA that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

a TRANSPOSABLE GENETIC ELEMENT that often contains genes in addition to those required for transposition, such as antibiotic-resistance genes. There are two main classes in prokaryotes: compound or composite, having copies of an INSERTION SEQUENCE at each end; and complex, having terminal INVERTED REPEAT sequences (generally about 30bp) but no known insertion sequences.

transposon

see transposable genetic elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Artificial transposable elements pTn5cat1 and pTn5Spcat endowed with restriction sites for PacI, PmeI and SwaI (unpublished) were used to obtain a collection of insertional mutants, each with an extra restriction site for these endonucleases.
Transposable elements such as Alu's are common in loci involved with DNA damage and repair, and are notably active in tissue (cell-type) differentiation.
Transposable elements as the key to a 21st century view of evolution.
Genetics and epigenetics in flower pigmentation associated with transposable elements in morning glories.
midae, 21% of the microsatellite flanking regions showed similarity (68%-- 90%) to known transposable elements, suggesting an association with microsatellites in this species as well (Appendix Table A4).
Mutation of acquired genes involves DNA acquired from extra-chromosomes (foreign DNA) delivered to bacterial strains by plasmids, bacteriophages (bacteria-lysing viruses), naked sequences of DNA, or transposable elements (e.
This differs from the most common explanation for the origin of viruses, as rogue particles that separated themselves from chromosomes and therefore are akin to transposable elements that move about within the nucleus.
Researchers from around the world working in the field and related disciplines discuss the roles of proteolysis in plant self- incompatibility, the epigenetic regulation of transposable elements in plants, proteins and interactions, expression quantitative trait loci analysis, plants' sensing and responding to excess light, phloem transport, cellulosic biofuels, jasmonate action, selaginella, the circadian system in higher plants, photorespiratory metabolism, environmental effects on the spatial and temporal patterns of leaf and root growth, genetically engineered plants and foods, and other topics.
Short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs) are excluded from imprinted regions in the human genome.
Methylation of cytosine in DNA is an epigenetic mark that is important for genome stability, transcriptional regulation of endogenous genes, and permanent silencing of transposable elements and viral sequences.
To make this transformation clear, I briefly digress to the narrative that surrounds Barbara McClintock, a Nobel Prize winner who, in the 1940s, developed a theory for genetic transformations based on what she called transposable elements, or transposons, which are short sequences of DNA that are able to shift position within genetic material.
Scientifically, they are better known as transposons or transposable elements because of their ability to 'jump' from one position of the genome to another, sometimes having a dramatic effect on the host organism.