transilient

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tran·sil·i·ent

(tran-sil'ē-ĕnt),
Jumping across; passing over; pertaining to those cortical association fibers in the brain that pass from one convolution to another nonadjacent one.
[L. transilio, to leap across, fr. salio, to leap]

transilient

A near-extinct adjective defined as "passing across”, referring specifically to the traversing of associative fibres in noncontiguous gyri of the cerebral cortex.

tran·sil·i·ent

(tran-zil'yĕnt)
Jumping across; passing over; pertaining to those cortical association fibers in the brain that pass from one convolution to another, nonadjacent, one.
[L. transilio, to leap across, fr. salio, to leap]

transilient

(trăns-sĭl′ē-ĕnt)
Jumping across or passing over as occurs when nerve fibers in the brain link nonadjacent convolutions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Note that the demographic and basic genetic conditions (the roles of epistasis and recombination) of the genetic transilience and founder-flush models are mechanistically compatible and that these models differ primarily in the timing and triggering agent of selection.
Rice and Hostert (1993) begin their discussion of genetic transilience speciation by dismissing my experimental studies on D.
To avoid perpetuating this confusion, the term "adaptive divergence" will be used in the remainder of this note to refer to those uses of "allopattic" by Rice and Hostert that clearly relate to the adaptive divergence mechanism and not to genetic transilience.) These adaptive divergence experiments usually used stocks that had been in the laboratory for many generations, and hence began with an "unnatural" source of genetic variation.
These results are highly supportive of genetic transilience, but of course they do not prove that the less extreme founder effects found in nature would have the same effects (Templeton, 1989); but neither do the experiments cited by Rice and Hostert (1993) prove that natural selection operating upon natural gene pools would have the same effects as highly artificial selective regimes operating upon laboratory altered gene pools.
However, most of these experimental contrasts violate the conditions required for genetic transilience (Templeton 1980; Carson and Templeton 1984), as will be discussed in more detail shortly.
(1993) were excluded from the meta-analysis is that genetic transilience is likely to occur only when many conditions in addition to a bottleneck are satisfied (Templeton 1980).
Recall that both the genetic transilience and founder-flush models place great importance on recombination as a source of genetic variation in the founding population.
For example, the triggering event under genetic transilience is a severe alteration of allele frequency at a major locus due to the initial founding event.
Relative to positive versus negative results, Carson and Templeton (1984) also pointed out that some of the strongest experimental evidence for genetic transilience comes from experiments using organisms that have more of the attributes facilitating genetic transilience as given in Table 2 of Templeton (1980) than are possessed by most standard laboratory organisms, such as D.
This confirms major predictions of the genetic transilience theory (Templeton 1980, 1987).
The literature that Rice and Hostert (1993) cite in favor of selection facilitating speciation via pleiotropy and/or hitchhiking is also germane to genetic transilience speciation.