transhumanism

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transhumanism

(trăns-hyo͞o′mə-nĭz′əm, trănz-)
n.
1. A belief that humans should strive to transcend the physical limitations of the mind and body by technological means.
2. A movement of people who espouse such a belief.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transhumanists subdivide into categories whose distinctions are not clear to the nonenhanced eye: extropians (who believe self-directed people can reverse the tendency of systems toward disorder), abolitionists (who say human suffering can be radically reduced if not eliminated), cryonicists (who want to have their bodies frozen for future resurrection), immortalists (self-explanatory), and many others.
Some transhumanists claim to be motivated by social democratic rather than libertarian values, and suggest that we use genetic modification to bring everyone up to at least the current mean in health, intelligence, and life expectancy, after which all humanity would begin its posthuman journey in unison.
Transhumanists argue it is time humans broke free of their 'biological chains'.
19) The World Transhumanist Association (WTA), started in 1997 by Swedish philosopher Nick Bostrom, is one group of transhumanists that has articulated a stance on nanotechnology, and is watching developments in the field closely.
Biocons have made the permissibility of direct intervention in the germ line a touchstone issue, and many transhumanists have followed them in framing the debate in these terms.
Transhumanists, as Stock's book title suggests, "are motivated by the desperately utopian objective of correcting the 'mistakes' of nature by creating a 'post-human' species," Smith told THE NEW AMERICAN.
A brief list will enable us to glimpse what is worrisome about the hopes of transhumanists, and the hopes and fears of their predecessors.
Transhumanists believe that humanity ought to enter into a post-Darwinian phase of existence where intelligences, rather than the blind forces of natural selection, are in control of their own evolution" (36).
Agar unfolds his argument in engagement with four transhumanists who cheerfully call for the radical enhancement he rejects.
Admittedly, this may be a shocking conclusion for Allenby and Sarewitz--who seem to have drawn much of their understanding of transhumanism from the 1997 scifi/biopunk film Gattaca--but rest assured, transhumanists themselves have already reached a similar conclusion.
Amazingly ahead of his time, Duke sounded very much like today's transhumanists (or as they prefer to be called these days, bioprogressives).