transsexual

(redirected from Transexuals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

transsexual

 [trans-sek´shoo-al]
1. a person affected by transsexualism.
2. a person whose external anatomy has been changed to resemble that of the opposite sex.

trans·sex·u·al

(trans-sek'shū-ăl), Avoid the misspelling transexual.
1. A person with the external genitalia and secondary sexual characteristics of one gender, but whose personal identification and psychosocial configuration are that of the opposite gender; a study of morphologic, genetic, and gonadal structure may be genitally congruent or incongruent.
2. Denoting or relating to such a person.
3. Relating to medical and surgical procedures designed to alter a patient's external sexual characteristics so that they resemble those of the opposite gender.

transsexual

(trăns-sĕk′sho͞o-əl)
adj.
1. Identifying as or having undergone medical treatment to become a member of the opposite sex.
2. Of or relating to transsexual people.
n.
One who is transsexual.

transsexual

[transek′cho̅o̅·əl]
a person whose gender identity is the opposite of his or her biological sex.
adjective Referring to transsexualism
noun A person who manifests transsexuality—a disturbance of gender identity in which the person feels a life-long discomfort with his or her own sex and a compelling desire to be of the opposite sex

transsexual

adjective Referring to transsexual behavior noun A person manifesting transsexualism, see there.

trans·sex·u·al

(tranz-sek'shū-ăl)
1. A person with the external genitalia and secondary sexual characteristics of one sex, but whose personal identification and psychosocial configuration is that of the opposite sex; a study of morphologic, genetic, and gonadal structure may be genitally congruent or incongruent.
2. Denoting or relating to such a person.
3. Relating to medical and surgical procedures designed to alter a patient's external sexual characteristics so that they resemble those of the opposite sex.

Transsexual

A person with gender identity disorder who has an overwhelming desire to change anatomic sex; one who seeks hormonal or surgical treatment to change sex.
References in periodicals archive ?
ENHANCEMENT, ANALOGY, AND TRANSEXUAL EXCEPTIONALISM
Our ingestion of mass-produced food, beyond what it does to our transexual and non-transexual bodies, is made possible through the exploitation of (mostly non-transexual female) cheap labor.
The idea that the transexual person's real self is revealed through SRS is very similar to the claims made by plastic surgeons and their patients in the 1940s and 1950s about the revelation of the real (non-transexual female) self behind wrinkled faces or small breasts.
Particularly in transexual writers' accounts of the differences, one simply elects to have nose-reduction surgery, liposuction, Botox injections, and so on without any medically required psychiatric therapy, "real life tests," or letters of certification from mental health professionals, all of which are required before a reputable surgeon will perform SRS.
It characterizes transexual agency as false by conflating SRS with giving in to the power of binary sex/gender ("the politics of this").
Next I ask: what kinds of non-transexual bodies are naturalized in the trope of transexual exceptionalism?
Because of the simultaneous plasticity and collectivity of "transgender" then, it can stand as a kind of "euphemism" for transexual, much as gender became a "euphemism" for sex.
So, one unintended consequence of transgender's success as a category is, I would argue, its capacity to enable MNTs and FNTs to celebrate trans(gender) "difference" while removing the dis-ease produced by the desires of specifically transexual people for SRS.
I was in the waiting room of a clinic for transgender and transexual men and women, where several people were waiting to see a doctor.
While the reservations I hear are about the politics of SRS performed on the transexual body, I believe they are about something more: a sense of horror at the thought of cutting into the non-transexual body at the key somatic locations that secure its non-transexuality, a visceral shudder at the thought of losing (rather than gaining) literal flesh that has, for all our theory, come to tell us something real and essential about ourselves.
In this fantasy, the starting point, the ontology, is a transexual one.
While I do not have the space to go into all the ramifications of this point, it is necessary to note at least that while the hallmark of male-to-female surgery is genital reconstruction, for transexual men, genital surgeries are not nearly as sophisticated (and are much more expensive), and transsexual men frequently forego genital surgery.