transsexual

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Related to Transexuality: transsexuality, Transgenderism

transsexual

 [trans-sek´shoo-al]
1. a person affected by transsexualism.
2. a person whose external anatomy has been changed to resemble that of the opposite sex.

trans·sex·u·al

(trans-sek'shū-ăl), Avoid the misspelling transexual.
1. A person with the external genitalia and secondary sexual characteristics of one gender, but whose personal identification and psychosocial configuration are that of the opposite gender; a study of morphologic, genetic, and gonadal structure may be genitally congruent or incongruent.
2. Denoting or relating to such a person.
3. Relating to medical and surgical procedures designed to alter a patient's external sexual characteristics so that they resemble those of the opposite gender.

transsexual

(trăns-sĕk′sho͞o-əl)
adj.
1. Identifying as or having undergone medical treatment to become a member of the opposite sex.
2. Of or relating to transsexual people.
n.
One who is transsexual.
adjective Referring to transsexualism
noun A person who manifests transsexuality—a disturbance of gender identity in which the person feels a life-long discomfort with his or her own sex and a compelling desire to be of the opposite sex

transsexual

adjective Referring to transsexual behavior noun A person manifesting transsexualism, see there.

trans·sex·u·al

(tranz-sek'shū-ăl)
1. A person with the external genitalia and secondary sexual characteristics of one sex, but whose personal identification and psychosocial configuration is that of the opposite sex; a study of morphologic, genetic, and gonadal structure may be genitally congruent or incongruent.
2. Denoting or relating to such a person.
3. Relating to medical and surgical procedures designed to alter a patient's external sexual characteristics so that they resemble those of the opposite sex.

Transsexual

A person with gender identity disorder who has an overwhelming desire to change anatomic sex; one who seeks hormonal or surgical treatment to change sex.
References in periodicals archive ?
What has struck me most about these conversations--over coffee or drinks at a conference in Chicago or in a bar in Greenwich Village--has been a widespread political and personal conflict that non-transexuals are willing to express to me, sotto voce, not just as someone studying the politics of transexuality but also as a fellow non-transexual.
Some clarifications are necessary at this point: by "non-transexual" I refer specifically, and in the negative, to the medicalized category of transexuality and its emblematic entailment of genital sex-reassignment surgery.
While critically inclined or politically progressive people who are white, male, or heterosexual might be willing to reflect on their normativity--often by means of analogy--the very recency of transexuality as a subject position makes it harder to imagine a similar possibility for reflection by those of us who are non-transexuals.
In short, I am arguing that this question is a demand on the politicalness of the transexual body but that it is simultaneously a naturalization of the embodiedness, and an evasion of the politicalness, of the non-transexual body that asks it; and that it obscures how "agency" is understood and assigned in social scientific accounts of transexuality and SRS.
It is important to note that I do not intend to engage the ongoing debate about whether transexuality upholds or contests patriarchy, binary gender, or misogyny in order to come down on the side of contestation.
There is also opposition to the perceived voluntarism of SRS in the medical disciplines that have shaped the field of transexuality, even though SRS has been a broadly accepted medical practice for over forty years.
(28) We must ask ourselves then: what implicit value is placed on those parts of the body and those practices that produce surgical transexuality that make them seem radically different from these other practices; and which in turn produce this analogy as the one that can be relied upon to demonstrate the failure of analogy in general?
And second, what do alternatives to transexuality (in particular, the category transgender) make available to non-transexuals for arguing against SRS?
(32) But it is also evident in the conversations I have had with non-transexual scholars who see possibilities in "transgender" that are qualitatively different from those of "transexual." "Transgender" can thus both incorporate and stand in for "transexuality," displacing non-transexuals' anxieties around SRS.
To be able to ask whether transexuality upholds or contests binary sex/gender is, in the end, a privilege of both the naturalized non-transexual body and that body's agency.
This fantasy proposes transexuality as an ordinary state, conjured not by an imagining of a scalpel at work on a body that is always already secure in its meaning, but from the phenomenological perspective of a body that desires to be something other than what it is, a self body that could be made whole of through a discourse of transexuality and the practice of SRS.