trans fat

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Related to Trans-fats: Saturated fats

trans fat

(trăns)
n.
1. A trans fatty acid.
2. Trans fatty acids considered as a group.

trans fat

An unsaturated fat containing a trans—i.e., the carbon moieties on the two sides of the double bond point in opposite directions—(E)- isomer. Trans fats (TFs) are not found in nature; minimal TFs are present in animal fats. TFs are abundant in margarines, frying fats and shortenings, and are formed when polyunsaturated fat-rich vegetable and marine oils and vegetable shortenings are “hardened” by partial hydrogenation, producing fats with a firmness and consistency desired by both food manufacturers and consumers. The most abundant TF is elaidic acid and its isomers, which are 18-carbon molecules with one double bond.

TFs comprise 6 to 8% of the daily per capita consumption of fat in developed nations; health experts recommend reduction of TFs to trace amounts, as increased dietary TFs result in increased total and LDL-cholesterol, reduced HDL-cholesterol and an increased risk of coronary artery disease.

trans fat

A fat derived from the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Examples include vegetable shortening and margarine. Studies have associated trans-fat consumption with an increased risk for coronary artery disease.
See also: fat
References in periodicals archive ?
US lead researcher Dr Beatrice Golomb, from the University of California at San Diego, said: "While trans-fats increase the shelf life of foods, they reduce the shelf life of people."
In Denmark, almost all trans-fats have been banned since 2003 but they are widely used in the UK.
We used VFA-IR spectroscopy to determine the total isolated trans-fats in oil samples extracted from fast food French fries (American Oil Chemists' Society 1999; Mossoba et al.
In Trial 1, which was our first round of testing done in June of 2008, fat extracted from French fries obtained from six restaurants had little-to-no detectable trans-fats, and all six of these restaurants were reporting "zero" trans-fat in French fries in their 2008 literature.
People in the UK and other northern European countries, on the other hand, are more likely to consume foods laden with saturated and trans-fats.
Trans-fats are modified vegetable fats used to improve shelf-life and found in fast foods, pastries, cakes and biscuits.
Trans-fats are modified vegetable fats used to improve shelf-life and often found in fast foods, pastries, cakes and biscuits.
Denmark has banned all but trace amounts of trans-fats in food since 2003, and of California intends to phase them out.
"Dietary guidelines for heart disease prevention recommend reducing intakes of both trans-fats and saturated fat.
Kerr said: "I am gathering the evidence against trans-fats to see whether we do need to ban them and I do not rule out a radical position.
Food companies have been under pressure to develop healthier products since the US government last year issued new regulations requiring all packaged foods to list how much trans-fats they contain.
Trans-fats are also up to 85 per cent cheaper than natural fats like butter, lard and palm oils.

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