trans fat

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trans fat

(trăns)
n.
1. A trans fatty acid.
2. Trans fatty acids considered as a group.

trans fat

An unsaturated fat containing a trans—i.e., the carbon moieties on the two sides of the double bond point in opposite directions—(E)- isomer. Trans fats (TFs) are not found in nature; minimal TFs are present in animal fats. TFs are abundant in margarines, frying fats and shortenings, and are formed when polyunsaturated fat-rich vegetable and marine oils and vegetable shortenings are “hardened” by partial hydrogenation, producing fats with a firmness and consistency desired by both food manufacturers and consumers. The most abundant TF is elaidic acid and its isomers, which are 18-carbon molecules with one double bond.

TFs comprise 6 to 8% of the daily per capita consumption of fat in developed nations; health experts recommend reduction of TFs to trace amounts, as increased dietary TFs result in increased total and LDL-cholesterol, reduced HDL-cholesterol and an increased risk of coronary artery disease.

trans fat

A fat derived from the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Examples include vegetable shortening and margarine. Studies have associated trans-fat consumption with an increased risk for coronary artery disease.
See also: fat
References in periodicals archive ?
When you check the food label for trans-fat, also check the food's ingredient list for partially hydrogenated vegetable oil -- which indicates that the food contains some trans fat, even if the amount is below 0.5 grams.
-Assess and monitor trans fats content in the food supply and changes in trans-fat consumption in the population.
Keywords: Fat, trans-fat, fast-food, fries, ATR-FTIR, Variable Filter Array Spectrometer, VFA-IR
The Food Safety Authority of Ireland said 57 per cent of the products contained no trans-fats at all and 23 per cent contained low levels.
Yum said it would start using low linolenic soybean oil, a zero trans-fat cooking oil.
"A two per cent increase in trans-fat consumption can result in a 27 per cent increase in saturated fat in the body.
ITEM: BusinessWeek.com reported on January 3, 2007: "Over the last few years, makers of packaged food have raced to eliminate or reduce trans fats, spurred by a Food & Drug Administration rule requiring nutritional labels to list trans-fat content starting in 2006.
The health-department proposal calls for New York City restaurants to switch to oils, margarines and shortening that have less than 0.5 grams of trans-fat per serving over a six-month period.
This January, mandatory trans-fat labeling arrived.
"FDA says it will require trans-fat amounts on food labels," The Lancet, vol.
The conclusions of two new reports by Dutch researchers strengthen the connection between coronary heart disease and high trans-fat intake.

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