trans fat

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Related to Trans fats: cholesterol, Hydrogenated oil, hydrogenation, Saturated fats

trans fat

(trăns)
n.
1. A trans fatty acid.
2. Trans fatty acids considered as a group.

trans fat

An unsaturated fat containing a trans—i.e., the carbon moieties on the two sides of the double bond point in opposite directions—(E)- isomer. Trans fats (TFs) are not found in nature; minimal TFs are present in animal fats. TFs are abundant in margarines, frying fats and shortenings, and are formed when polyunsaturated fat-rich vegetable and marine oils and vegetable shortenings are “hardened” by partial hydrogenation, producing fats with a firmness and consistency desired by both food manufacturers and consumers. The most abundant TF is elaidic acid and its isomers, which are 18-carbon molecules with one double bond.

TFs comprise 6 to 8% of the daily per capita consumption of fat in developed nations; health experts recommend reduction of TFs to trace amounts, as increased dietary TFs result in increased total and LDL-cholesterol, reduced HDL-cholesterol and an increased risk of coronary artery disease.

trans fat

A fat derived from the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Examples include vegetable shortening and margarine. Studies have associated trans-fat consumption with an increased risk for coronary artery disease.
See also: fat
References in periodicals archive ?
At the moment, there is no legal requirement to remove trans fats from foods.
But trans fats were found to increase early deaths by 34%.
Trans fats have no health benefits and pose a significant risk for heart disease, but the case for saturated fat is less clear," said de Souza.
So if you've ever experienced a craving for such delicious junk-food delicacies as donuts, frozen pizza, coffee creamers, orcanned cinnamon rolls, or fast-food fare like the Wendy's Baconator or Domino's extra-thick pan pizzas, get ready for a mouthful of disappointment: They are all products that currently rely heavily on trans fats.
This means that by 2018, we might find food products in supermarket aisles that may be free of trans fats.
Based on a review of scientific evidence, FDA has finalized its determination that partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs), the primary dietary source of artificial trans fat in processed foods, are not Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) for use in human food.
Trans fats were on the way out even before the FDA acted.
Meridian Foods wishes to make it clear that its peanut butter does not contain any trans fats .
Trans fats are also found in donuts, French fries and other deep-fried foods.
Condemning artificial trans fats as a threat to public health, the FDA announced Thursday it will require the food industry to phase them out.
This open comment period also technically affords those opposed to the ban the chance to provide data that show a ban is not necessary and that trans fats are not a public health concern, something that public health officials think is highly unlikely to occur.
Approaches to removing trans fats from the food supply in industrialized and developing countries.