trans fat

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trans fat

(trăns)
n.
1. A trans fatty acid.
2. Trans fatty acids considered as a group.

trans fat

An unsaturated fat containing a trans—i.e., the carbon moieties on the two sides of the double bond point in opposite directions—(E)- isomer. Trans fats (TFs) are not found in nature; minimal TFs are present in animal fats. TFs are abundant in margarines, frying fats and shortenings, and are formed when polyunsaturated fat-rich vegetable and marine oils and vegetable shortenings are “hardened” by partial hydrogenation, producing fats with a firmness and consistency desired by both food manufacturers and consumers. The most abundant TF is elaidic acid and its isomers, which are 18-carbon molecules with one double bond.

TFs comprise 6 to 8% of the daily per capita consumption of fat in developed nations; health experts recommend reduction of TFs to trace amounts, as increased dietary TFs result in increased total and LDL-cholesterol, reduced HDL-cholesterol and an increased risk of coronary artery disease.

trans fat

A fat derived from the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Examples include vegetable shortening and margarine. Studies have associated trans-fat consumption with an increased risk for coronary artery disease.
See also: fat
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers compared the trans fat levels in blood samples from New Yorkers before and after the ban, using records from a city health survey taken in 2004 and 2013.
According to the report, WHO and the American Heart Association recommend a dietary pattern that achieves 10 per cent of calories from saturated fat and 1 per cent calories from trans fats, which translates to less than 22 grams of saturated fat per day; 2 grams of trans fat with a 2,000-calorie diet.
Consumption of industrial trans fats contributed to more than half a million deaths annually from heart disease, according to the WHO.
World Health Organization (WHO) has welcomed the commitment by the International Food and Beverage Alliance (IFBA) to align with the WHO target to eliminate industrially produced trans fat from the global food supply by 2023.
* REview dietary sources of industrially-produced trans fats and the landscape for required policy change.
Artificial trans fats or trans fatty acids are manufactured through an industrial process that uses hydrogen to transform liquid vegetable oils into solid.
Anticipating that this requirement would eventually become law, manufacturers reduced 86 percent of trans fats prior to 2015, the Grocery Manufacturers Association reported.
Trans fats are mostly tasteless and created when hydrogen is added to vegetable oil as a thickening agent.
"It is highly recommended to choose zero gram trans fats foods with no hydrogenated oil in the ingredients list," said Rayan Saleh, dietician from the Department of Clinical Nutrition, Burjeel Hospital for Advanced Surgery, Dubai.
The trans fats have recently been identified as the cause of heart attacks and strokes, an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes and infertility in women.The fat is harmful on the human circulation system, causing a rise in levels of bad cholesterol and a decline in levels of good cholesterol.
WHO's package on the replacement of trans-fatty acids provides six strategic actions to ensure the prompt, complete, and sustained elimination of industrially-produced trans fats from the food supply:
-Assess and monitor trans fats content in the food supply and changes in trans-fat consumption in the population.