trait

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Related to Traits: Genetic traits

trait

 [trāt]
1. any genetically determined condition; also, the condition prevailing in the heterozygous state of a recessive disorder, as the sickle cell trait.
2. a distinctive behavior pattern.
sickle cell trait the condition, usually asymptomatic, of being heterozygous for hemoglobin S; see also sickle cell.

trait

(trāt),
1. A qualitative characteristic.
2. A discrete attribute as contrasted with metric character. A trait is amenable to segregation rather than quantitative analysis; it is an attribute of phenotype, not of genotype.
[Fr. from L. tractus, a drawing out, extension]

trait

(trāt)
1. any genetically determined characteristic; also, the condition prevailing in the heterozygous state of a recessive disorder, as the sickle cell trait.
2. a distinctive behavior pattern.

sickle cell trait  the condition, usually asymptomatic, due to heterozygosity for hemoglobin S.

trait

(trāt)
n.
1. A distinguishing feature, as of a person's character.
2. A morphological, physiological, or behavioral feature of an organism.

trait

Etymology: Fr, trace
1 a characteristic mode of behavior or any mannerism or physical feature that distinguishes one individual or culture from another.
2 any characteristic quality or condition that is genetically determined and inherited as part of a specific phenotype. A trait is inherited as homozygous dominant, homozygous recessive, or heterozygous in the ratio of 1:2:1 among offspring of two heterozygous parents. In medicine the term trait is used specifically to denote the heterozygous state of a recessive disorder, such as the sickle cell amemia. See also dominance, gene, Mendel's laws, recessive allele.

trait

Genetics An attribute or characteristic of an individual in a species for which heritable differences can be defined. See Bipolar trait, Complex trait, Heritability, High-sensation seeking trait, Input trait, Output trait, Sickle cell trait, Species.

trait

(trāt)
A qualitative characteristic; a discrete attribute as contrasted with metrical character. A trait is amenable to segregation rather than quantitative analysis; it is an attribute of phenotype, not of genotype.
[Fr. from L. tractus, a drawing out, extension]

trait

1. Any inheritable characteristic.
2. A mild form of a recessive genetic disorder.

Trait

A distinguishing feature of an individual.
Mentioned in: Birth Defects

trait

an enduring individual behavioural characteristic or aspect of personality that is exhibited in a wide range of contexts.

trait,

n a personal quality or distinct attribute of a human being, be it physical, mental, or genetic. See also constitution, diathesis, disposition, miasm, predisposition, susceptibility, and terrain.

trait

(trāt)
1. A qualitative characteristic.
2. Discrete attribute as contrasted with metric character.
[Fr. from L. tractus, a drawing out, extension]

trait (trāt),

n an inherited set of mental or bodily characteristics.
trait, Cooley's,
trait, sickle cell,
n a form of sickle cell disease in which patients are asymptomatic but their erythrocytes can be caused to assume a sickle shape under certain conditions. The trait is present when one parent has the gene (heterozygous condition) for sickle cell disease. See also disease, sickle cell.

trait

1. any genetically determined condition; also, the condition prevailing in the heterozygous state of a recessive disorder.
2. a distinctive behavior pattern.

trait A-46
see inherited parakeratosis.
qualitative trait
a characteristic that is expressed only in descriptive terms, e.g. fine bone, deep chest.
quantitative trait
a characteristic that is expressed mathematically, e.g. an annual yield of milk of 15,000 lb.
sex-linked trait
the gene for the trait is located on the chromosomes which determine the sex of the individual.
References in classic literature ?
As most of these old Custom-House officers had good traits, and as my position in reference to them, being paternal and protective, was favourable to the growth of friendly sentiments, I soon grew to like them all.
He beheld a war- worn and weather-beaten countenance, full of energy, and expressive of an iron will; but the gentle wisdom, the deep, broad, tender sympathies, were altogether wanting in Old Blood-and-Thunder's visage; and even if the Great Stone Face had assumed his look of stern command, the milder traits would still have tempered it.
Yet, having intimated that her appearance was peculiar, as being unlike that of her Flemish companions, I have little more to say respecting it; I can pronounce no encomiums on her beauty, for she was not beautiful; nor offer condolence on her plainness, for neither was she plain; a careworn character of forehead, and a corresponding moulding of the mouth, struck me with a sentiment resembling surprise, but these traits would probably have passed unnoticed by any less crotchety observer.
Such was the issue of the battle, as far as its results came under my observation: and as it appeared to be considered an event of prodigious importance, I reasonably concluded that the wars of the natives were marked by no very sanguinary traits.
The prince had that clear and keen look which distinguishes birds of prey of the noble species; his physiognomy itself presented several distinct traits of this resemblance.
You transmute the commonest traits into gold of your own; but after all there are no new names.
I have had no opportunity to find out any thing about the upper classes by my own observation, but from what I hear said about them I judge that what they lack in one or two of the bad traits the canaille have, they make up in one or two others that are worse.
These were not traits which I could imagine in Strickland.
Like many other of his traits and mannerisms this was the result of environment rather than heredity or reversion, and even though he was outwardly a man, the Englishman and the girl were both impressed with the naturalness of the act.
These are essential traits of the wolf and the wild-dog when they have become domesticated, and these traits White Fang possessed in unusual measure.
I opened the letter rather indifferently, for father, with all his excellent and lovable traits, was but a poor correspondent; his letters were usually very brief and very unimportant.
From the unorganized material thus brought clearly to the author's consciousness Imagination next selects the details which can be turned to present use, and proceeds to combine them, uniting scattered traits and incidents, perhaps from widely different sources, into new characters, stories, scenes, and ideas.