tracer

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tracer

 [trās´er]
1. a means or agent by which certain substances or structures can be identified or followed, as a radioactive tracer.
2. a mechanical device by which the outline of an object or the direction and extent of movement of a part may be graphically recorded; see also tracing.
3. a dissecting instrument for isolating vessels and nerves.
radioactive tracer a radioactive isotope replacing a stable chemical element in a compound (said to be radiolabeled) and so able to be followed or tracked through one or more reactions or systems by means of a radiation detector; used especially for such a compound that is introduced into the body for study of the compound's metabolism, distribution, and passage through the body.

trac·er

(trās'ĕr),
1. An element or compound containing atoms that can be distinguished from their normal counterparts by physical means (for example, radioactivity assay or mass spectrography) and can thus be used to follow (trace) the metabolism of the normal substances.
See also: tracing (2).
2. A colored or radioactive substance that can be injected in the region of a tumor (for example, melanoma, breast) to map the flow of lymph from the tumor to its nearest nodal basin; used in sentinel node detection.
See also: tracing (2).
3. A colored substance (for example, a dye) used as a tracer to follow the flow of water.
See also: tracing (2).
4. An instrument used in dissecting out nerves and blood vessels.
See also: tracing (2).
5. A mechanical device with a marking point attached to one jaw and a graph plate or tracing plate attached to the other jaw; used to record the direction and extent of movements of the mandible.
See also: tracing (2).
[M.E. track, fr. O. Fr. tracier, to make one's way, fr. L. traho, pp. tractum, to draw, + -er, agent suffix]

tracer

/trac·er/ (trās´er)
1. a dissecting instrument for isolating vessels and nerves.
2. a mechanical device for graphically recording the outline of an object or the direction and extent of movement of a part.
3. a means or agent by which certain substances or structures can be identified or followed.

radioactive tracer  a radioactive isotope replacing a stable chemical element in a compound and so able to be followed or tracked through one or more reactions or systems; generally one that is introduced into and followed through the body.

tracer

(trā′sər)
n.
An identifiable substance, such as a dye or a radioactive isotope, that is introduced into a biological or mechanical system and can be followed through the course of a process, providing information on the pattern of events in the process or on the redistribution of the parts or elements involved. Also called label.

tracer

Etymology: L, trahere, to draw
1 a radioactive isotope that is used in diagnostic x-ray techniques to allow a biological process to be seen. After introduction into the body, the tracer binds with a specific substance and is followed with a scanner or fluoroscope as it passes through various organs or systems. Kinds of tracers include radioactive iodine and radioactive carbon. See also radioisotope scan.
2 a mechanical device that graphically records the outline or movements of an object or part of the body.
3 a dissecting instrument that is used to isolate vessels and nerves. trace, v.

tracer

Imaging A substance, such as a radioisotope, used in imaging procedures

trac·er

(trā'sĕr)
1. An element or compound containing atoms that can be distinguished from their normal counterparts by physical means (e.g., radioactivity assay or mass spectrography) and can thus be used to follow (trace) the metabolism of the normal substances.
2. A colored substance (e.g., a dye) used as a tracer to follow the flow of water.
3. An instrument used in dissecting out nerves and blood vessels.
4. A mechanical device with a marking point attached to one jaw and a graph plate or tracing plate attached to the other jaw; used to record the direction and extent of movements of the mandible.
See also: tracing (2)

tracer

1. A biochemical that has been tagged with a radioactive atom so that its destination can be determined.
2. A length of nucleic acid tagged with a radioactive atom that can be used to find and identify samples of its complementary strand.

tracer

any rare ISOTOPE, for example radioactive forms such as 14C, which is administered in some way to organisms so that its fate may be subsequently followed within the organism or in the products of its METABOLISM.

trac·er

(trā'sĕr)
1. A mechanical device with a marking point attached to one jaw and a graph plate or tracing plate attached to the other jaw; used to record direction and extent of mandibular movements.
2. An element or compound containing atoms that can be distinguished from their normal counterparts by physical means (e.g., radioactivity assay or mass spectrography) and can thus be used to follow (trace) metabolism of normal substances.
3. Colored or radioactive substance that can be injected in region of a tumor (e.g., melanoma, breast) to map lymph flow from tumor to its nearest nodal basin; used in sentinel node detection.

tracer

a means by which something may be followed, as (1) a mechanical device by which the outline or movements of an object can be graphically recorded, or (2) a material by which the progress of a compound through the body may be observed.

radioactive tracer
a radioactive isotope replacing a stable chemical element in a compound introduced into the body, enabling its metabolism, distribution and elimination to be followed in the living animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
223-caliber tracer bullets from a private buyer at the Phoenix-area gun show.
Spectrum Tracer Services is a downhole chemical and radioactive tracer technology company specialising in well completion diagnostics and reservoir characterization.
To facilitate manual retrieval of conventional tracers from drain-and-rinse screens, it is common to use large density tracers: 32 mm for DMCs with feed topsize up to 80 mm (see Figure 1), and 32 mm or 64 mm in dense medium baths and vessels.
The normalized concentrations of most of the outdoor tracers were reasonably low inside the building, running 1 to 2 percent of the indoor tracer concentration.
The following list covers some of the free sites that professional tracers use today:
Different routes were used to synthesize PS and PP macromolecule tracers.
The acquired tracers will be developed and validated by a team at Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Lilly's wholly owned subsidiary focused on molecular imaging.
The fun of having the tracer option in calibers previously lacking tracers.
This meant that tracer uptake by bone could be used as a direct measure of new bone mineralization.
The patients identified for the tracers are chosen by the surveyors from the hospital's clinical service groups (CSG).
The second unusual new product is a family of molecular tracers for flexible and rigid packaging that add distinct chemical "signatures" to plastic products.
Two new Digital Voice Tracers are to be launched by Royal Philips Electronics in September, offering users advanced note taking and stereo recording facilities.