micronutrient

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micronutrient

 [mi″kro-noo´tre-ent]
a dietary element essential only in small quantities, such as selenium, copper, or manganese.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

micronutrient

Any of the necessary minor components of a well-balanced diet, including vitamins and minerals, which are ingested either in relatively large amounts (thus known as macrominerals) or in minimal amounts (known as trace minerals).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

micronutrient

Clinical nutrition A minor and necessary component of a balanced diet–eg, vitamins, minerals. See Diet. Cf Macronutrient, Minerals, Non-nutritive dietary component, Vitamins.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

micronutrient

any TRACE ELEMENT (e.g. zinc) or compound required in only minute amounts by organisms. Compare MACRONUTRIENT.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Regional Differences in White Wine Trace-Element Composition
As noted previously, only white wine trace-element concentrations are used here to discuss regional differences in composition.
Trace-element concentrations for a new wine are converted to a [Log.sub.10] format and inserted into Table 4 equations.
Many studies suggest that wines can be fingerprinted with trace-element data at the vineyard level through to regional level (Latorre et al., 1994; Stroh et al., 1994; Day et al., 1995; Greenough et al., 1996; 1997; Baxter et al., 1997; Danzer et al., 1999; Taylor et al., 2002; 2003; Diaz et al., 2003).
2) implies that similar geochemical processes are controlling trace-element behaviour in the wines.
An alternative explanation may be that areas with higher Degree Day values--warmer temperatures--yield greater evaporative losses leading to more water uptake by grapes, thus increasing trace-element concentrations in grapes.
Regardless of the underlying causes, there are strong regional variations in the trace-element composition of Canadian wines.